My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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GENEVA, Monday—Although the Human Rights Commission is scheduled to remain in session here only until the end of this week, it was decided that we would not work on last Saturday afternoon, even though it is quite obvious we are not going to be able to finish our agenda. I think it would take three weeks more of very faithful work to get through. The suggestion was made by some that we stay an extra week, but some of our delegates would have to leave and we still would not be through.

It seems to me that the best that can be done is to do as much work on the covenant as we can, and transmit it to the Economic and Social Council with a request that they decide either to reconvene us before the General Assembly, and let us report on the work done at that time, or to put off the date for finally presenting a covenant to the General Assembly till a year later. The Economic and Social Council is our parent body and the final decision must be theirs.

My young cousin, Warren Robbins, and his wife, are staying here with Mr. and Mrs. Pinckney Tuck. Just before the close of the session on Saturday they all came in to listen to the arguments and stayed for lunch with me at the Palais. Later in the day I had to do a recorded interview on human rights for UNESCO to use on the radio at some future date. It was very nice to see Warren again and to meet his wife whom I had never seen.

I had a little time to go shopping on Saturday afternoon and I walked leisurely through the streets, wishing I could spend a long time looking into shop windows. Then I heard a carillon ring out that reminded me it was growing late and I hurried across the bridge to our hotel, stopping only at the little island to look at the Rousseau statue. I see it so often from my bedroom window that I thought I must get a little nearer view. He had a fine and interesting head, more impressive from nearby than from a distance. The swans and ducks and pigeons that flop around in the water, though, are really more attractive from my window than they are at close quarters.

A number of the people who are here attending the World Health Organization meeting came to tea with me, among them Dr. Leonard A. Scheele and Mrs. India Edwards.

One of my other guests was Mrs. Sonya Das, who had just sent me a copy of her book, "The American Woman and Modern Marriage," which I find a scholarly and interesting study and very readable.

Late in the afternoon I went for a few minutes to the home of Paul Ruegger, head of the International Committee of the Red Cross, for a reception. Since coming to Geneva this time I have found it quite pleasant to go into a room and see at least a few familiar faces. I feel at home with the Swiss people and find them kind and warm in their welcome.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, NHyP