My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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GENEVA, Tuesday—The flight from New York City to Gander, Newfoundland, last Friday was uneventful. It was clear enough for us to see the land and the water below us now and then, although occasionally clouds piled up and looked like nice fleecy blankets under us. Miss Thompson, Miss Marjorie Whiteman of the Legal Division of the State Department and I all enjoyed the trip and bought some post-cards to record our successful arrival at Gander. Ward Morehouse, drama critic of the New York World-Telegram and Sun was also aboard and kept writing his column all the time. This made me feel very guilty because I had decided to wait until I was safely through the whole trip before I wrote this column.

We were a little late in arriving in London, but it was still warm and sunny and we were greeted with great enthusiasm by those who waited for us at the airport.

Lady Stella Reading said, however, with her usual honesty, "We have had a most horrible winter. This is the first nice, sunny day and we attribute it all to your arrival."

H. John Kelly of our embassy was on hand to greet us, as was Henry Morgenthau III.

At our hotel we got hold of Miss Elizabeth Tucker who had arranged a number of radio interviews at BBC in the afternoon, all of which by now have been flown back to the United States. I particularly enjoyed talking with Alec Waugh, the novelist, and to Christopher Fry, whose play has been running successfully on Broadway this winter. However, I think Sir William Rootes, an industrialist, gave one of the clearest pictures of the present economic situation in England and in the United States.

Later, Miss Thompson, Miss Whiteman and I dined with Lady Stella Reading. She had two or three interesting women guests and we were able to talk quite intimately and informally and enjoyed our evening very much.

Don't let anyone mislead you about spring weather in London. There was a fire in the grate, and even though it is the middle of April one needs a warm coat if one is going out to dinner.

Sunday morning after breakfast we read our British newspapers, which are much thinner than the bulky Sunday editions at home.

At 11 a.m. we took off for Geneva. We crossed the channel, saw Dieppe below us, then the small and neat fields of northern France, passed over Paris and then over the wooded hills south of the capital. Soon the snow-capped mountains could be seen ahead of us. This was really an exciting sight for me, because in 1947 I came into Geneva late in the evening in a snowstorm and saw nothing. Leaving Geneva that year we took off at 3 o'clock in the morning and again saw nothing.

This time Lake Leman with its beautiful blue waters sparkled beneath us and off in the distance one white-capped peak after another could be seen. We saw the Palais des Nations as we circled above this city, and after we landed we were met by our Minister to Switzerland, John Carter Vincent and his wife; R.E. Ward, Jr., our consul; the Mayor of Geneva and his wife, and various officials of the city and representatives from the United Nations.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL