My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK, Friday—Thursday morning I saw a short movie made from photographs taken on a round-the-world trip by Albert Crews, director of the Protestant Radio Commission with Dr. Franklin C. Fry, president of the United Lutheran Church. These gentlemen visited Japan, Korea, Burma, Hong Kong, India, Pakistan, Israel, Arabia, Greece and Germany to investigate what they already knew was the tragic situation of refugees the world over.

The film "Home Is Nowhere," is being shown three times over this Easter weekend and I hope everyone who possibly can will tune it in. I hope also that the picture will be shown in churches and schools and women's clubs and in various service organizations all over the country. It makes very real the suffering of people, especially of children, and in spite of the fact that it is governments that usually make wars, it is the people who fight them and who live through the horrible aftermath. The picture truly delivers the message it is intended to do.

I also received today from President Truman's State of Missouri a protest that rightfully should be directed to the President and members of Congress. However, it may be that the sender, a woman, thought another woman would realize more quickly the importance of her message and so she sent it to me.

She points out that during a period of crisis agriculture and home economics contribute largely to the effort to keep our people well fed. The cuts, therefore, proposed by the Bureau of the Budget and recommended by the President seem to women particularly harmful. This woman says that it will almost abolish adult education in Missouri and she thinks it must do about the same in other states.

The George-Barden appropriation, which these cuts will affect, gave the Federal aid necessary to develop good home economics information and good agricultural and industrial educational programs in the high schools of the nation. She feels therefore, that an appeal by women everywhere should be made to their congressmen and senators not to cut off such aid. She contends that it may affect the health of our own people when we need their cooperation and maximum production ability both on the farms and in the factories.

This seems to make sense to me, and I speak of it here because she says the vote will come very soon. I know how slow very often is the communication between the people and their representatives.

I also have an appeal from the Chinese-American Associates For Good Will. The organization's director, William Yinson Lee, is anxious to have his group correct any misunderstanding that may arise between the citizens of the United States and the Chinese-American citizens who form any minority group. He says they are a very loyal minority and they are trying hard to correct any mistaken ideas that may arise because of Chinese Communist action in Korea.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL