My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Sunday—On Wednesday of last week I went to West Orange, New Jersey, to a school which I had dedicated 17 years ago. They were celebrating the fiftieth anniversary of the founding of their Parent Teachers Association, and it was good to see people who took such an interest in education and in the community activities that create a good atmosphere for the growing child.

Thursday night I attended the dinner of the Asia Institute which was given in honor of President Entezam of the General Assembly of the United Nations. It was a memorable occasion for me, even aside from the very good speeches and the delightful company. Some very interesting slides were shown of Persian art, and then of the most beautiful colored pictures done by a new process which brings out color and line in a most extraordinary way.

The Asia Institute is one of the few schools of its kind where languages of the Near and Far East are taught. They have evolved a very good method and have a remarkable staff. Like so many institutions, they are not heavily endowed and are looking for more members and for greater interest in developing scholars in connection with the art, literature and history of this area of the world.

In contrast to the formal though pleasant atmosphere of the Institute dinner, Thursday noon provided me with an informal interlude. I spent a short time being driven out to Queens College for a talk on the United Nations under the auspices of the Educational Club. The president of the college told me the young people were responsible for all the arrangements. They came for me and brought me home and I thoroughly enjoyed the chance to talk to such an attentive audience. Queens College is not involved in the basketball scandal, but quite naturally all young people are interested in what happens to other young people and I found among them sympathy for the younger students who had been involved and had been good students academically.

At Mt. Vernon, where I spoke on Friday evening for the Sinai Temple, I met a man who is closely involved in the decisions to be made in connection with the City College students. I found that he felt as I do that the major blame lies at the door of those who are willing to bribe students, and that the colleges themselves must also bear some responsibility in that they should prevent games from becoming a business rather than a sport.

For a change, on Saturday, I went to hear someone else speak. Senator Margaret Chase Smith was speaking at Town Hall, and as I have a great admiration for her I stayed in New York City over the weekend especially to hear her. Since the weather was bad, I was not really grieved at missing the day in the country, though on the whole I like even the worst of days in my own home, out of the city atmosphere.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL