My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Wednesday—Because of the discussion over Universal Military Training, I think there is a greater interest in education than ever before. Various groups that have not before concerned themselves especially with education are now very much aware that when a boy or girl finishes high school, he has not finished his education but is just preparing for the next step.

There has come to me in the last few days a pamphlet entitled, "A Guide to Educational and Vocational Training in the Armed Services." Compiled by the Federation Employment Service, it is the result of a great many questions which they have received along the following lines:

"Is there any point in planning for a career now?"

"How can I get ahead in the service?"

"Can I continue my education while in service?"

"Is there anything I can learn while in service that I can use afterwards?"

This pamphlet tries to produce the answers to these and many more questions. Of course, it must be remembered that changes occur in the setup in the armed services at a time like this. Their first concern is the defense of our country, so that they are not primarily educational services. However, it has been found necessary to educate, to train and to develop character.

This pamphlet tries to relate army occupations to civilian jobs and to show what an ambitious young man or woman can do for their future while they are serving their country.

This is helpful not only to the young people but also to their parents, many of whom worry over the delay their children may have to face in starting homes of their own as early as they wish. It is undoubtedly true that if every effort is made to use educational opportunities during service, much time can be cut from the usual college and vocational education that will follow return to civilian life.

A unique motion picture, produced by Twentieth Century-Fox, had its premiere here the other day. It is called, "Of Men and Music," and if it is successful a series of such musical productions are planned that will include living artists as well as those we have known from the past. This seems like a really exciting, educational venture and something that will give to young and old alike an opportunity for a musical education such as few of us have had in the past.

The opening night was a benefit for the Hospitalized Veterans Music Service of which Mrs. Lytle Hull is general chairman and Mrs. Angier Biddle Duke was chairman for this particular occasion. This organization has done a very remarkable work not only of entertainment for hospitalized veterans but of teaching bedridden veterans how to play musical instruments. The students of New York City are to get tickets for this movie at half price in the daytime in order to make it possible for as many young people as possible to gain both education and entertainment in the field of music.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL