My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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WASHINGTON, Friday—On last Wednesday evening I was in Dunellen, N.J., a town of about a square mile that touches on Plainfield and Bound Brook on each side, so that the three communities are very closely allied. I've been telling some people down here about my visit there.

I went to Dunellen because I was interested to see how its United Nations Day Committee had drawn in many different organizations, young people and older people, in all three towns, and had emphasized the cooperation of the foreign groups who now live in the communities. The ushers were all ladies dressed in costumes of the countries from which their ancestors came, and there was a young American girl attired in red, white and blue. There were Czechoslovakian, Polish, Slovak, Dutch and French costumes. It was a very happy reminder of the fact that right here in our country we have sort of a U.N. where the people of different nations do live happily together!

The high-school auditorium holds some 1,300 people, and it was filled to capacity. I could only hope that I would be able to meet their evident desires for information with something that would make them feel that their community had a real responsibility for the future of the U.N. and that it was a continuing responsibility which we worked for here in our own communities day by day. Through the progress and improvement of our democracy we sustain the U.N., since it is only in improving our democratic standards that the aims of peace and economic security, which lie behind the formation of the U.N., can possibly be achieved.

On Thursday I had a particularly busy day. I saw Professor Barbara Wooten, who just returned from a tour of the country and was about to sail for Great Britain; I made a recording; and then attended the meeting of the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies and made a plane for Washington at 2:40 p.m.

Here, I attended a meeting on human rights in the State Department, where we discussed the United States position in the next meeting of the Human Rights Commission, which is in Geneva in April.

I am staying with my old friends, Mr. and Mrs. Adolph C. Miller, and today I breakfasted with my son, Franklin Jr. and his wife. Later in the morning I made more recordings until I went to Howard University at noon.

This afternoon I will spend a little time with Assistant Secretary John D. Hickerson of the State Department and then attend the celebration of Australia Day at the Australian Embassy. After that I will be at the Philippine Embassy to receive a posthumous award by that government to my husband. In the evening I will speak at the dinner for Americans for Democratic Action.

After I have actually carried out all of these things I will be able to write you a little more fully about them. I think you will agree it is going to be a busy day!

Incidentally, I interviewed Commissioner Arthur Wallander, who heads our civilian defense in New York City, and much that he said should be repeated in every city in the country. There is no assurance what cities, should we ever be at war, would be the targets of attack. If we know what to do there would be much less chance of panic and there would be less damage done.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL