My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK, Sunday—There is a committee in New York City called the Quaker Emergency Re-adjustment Center whose work is little known, but which is characterized by Albert Deutsch in an article published in Collier's as "one of the most cooperative efforts in this field (the field of sex crimes)." This is one of the few agencies where psychiatric care is free for people with problems of an emotional and sex nature. A staff of 22 psychiatrists, psychologists and social workers have volunteered their services so that any money received can go toward the maintenance of the clinic itself.

More than 1080 patients have been examined who were referred to the clinic by the Veterans Administration, the Magistrates Court, the American Friends Service Committee and other social service committees. The value of this service is inestimable for the protection of society, for these people are really ill and they need trained care and understanding which may save them from committing crimes against society.

Another article, published in a recent issue of the Nation by Richard Neuberger, Oregon state senator, suggests that at the present time the different organized groups representing the people of the United States carry a very heavy responsibility. Since we are the leading democracy of the world, the way we function is under constant scrutiny, and those who visit us from foreign shores are constantly watching how the people participate in their government.

It is of course entirely understandable that a group will represent its own special interest to a certain extent. But in times such as these, the special interests of any group merge very frequently in the interests of the whole society. Mr. Neuberger points to the responsibility of labor groups throughout the country, in backing candidates, to consider not alone their record on labor, but also their record as a whole and their abilities to fulfill the obligations of whatever office to which they are appointed or elected. I think the same could be said for industrial groups, bankers groups, medical associations or lawyers. A man might be a very excellent lawyer, for example, and still not represent a district in his state or in Washington very well because of some particular bias or some particular interest which might cloud his general outlook. On the other hand, it has often been the case that people who were in no way actually connected with labor groups proved better able to consider labor legislation and to see the whole picture and the value of certain laws than a man who is a representative of labor.

I have a most amusing letter from someone who signs himself Jesse Dorman, in which he assumes my husband would have taken certain actions were he alive today. The writer gives me no address, so I am unable to write to him personally, but I wish to assure him that I should like to do so because he says things that are not true. As to Russia, we must remember that the USSR has taken over a number of governments from within since the end of the war which she had not taken over before my husband's death. My correspondent also says he is about to present the truth, in a book he is going to write, as to our invasion of China. Since we have never invaded China and have reiterated time after time that we do not intend to do so, all this seems to me slightly untrue. The gentleman's conception of my husband and what he would do were he alive is open to question, for no one can speak for someone who is no longer here to speak for himself.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL