My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK, Thursday—One of the women who attended the meetings of the Associated Country Women of the World in Denmark last summer sent me an issue of the paper published by this organization at its headquarters in London. During the sessions an essay competition was sponsored by the group and in each of these essays a farm woman described her day.

First prize was won by Mrs. Andrew Auerbekk of Norway, and she called her essay simply, "My Day." Occasionally I have been led to believe that my own days are rather full, but I defy anyone to read this farm woman's day without a feeling that by the end of the day one would lie down gratefully and go to sleep without any difficulty. Second prize was won by a Mrs. Thompson of England, and I think there is a poetic expression of the beauty of her surroundings that makes hers an exceptional bit of writing. A Mrs. McPherson of the United States won third prize for her contribution titled, "A Grandmother Speaks." What a full and satisfying day this grandmother has, and it is easy to see why her grandchildren love to visit her!

To turn to some quite different literature, a few days ago I received a statement entitled, "Non-partisan Support of Enlightened Foreign Policy," from the Citizens' Conference on International Economic Union, which has its headquarters at 80 Lexington Avenue, New York City. There are details here and there in this statement with which I am not entirely in agreement. But, by and large, it is clear and easily understood and sets before us the world situation today in a way that I think will appeal to a great many people.

In its paragraph on aggressive communism the following statement is made:

"Can we not now say that as a matter of national policy it is not communism as such we are arming to combat, but revolutionary, expansionist communism which seeks to spread its doctrine not by legitimate example, but by terror and force. A religious war against communism as such would be as futile as the religious wars of Europe which ravaged the continent, brought hunger and misery, set back civilization, and promoted neither Catholicism nor Protestantism."

This makes good sense to me. I believe it is possible for countries trying out communism to live in the same world with democratic countries as long as each one only "seeks to spread its doctrines by legitimate example." It troubles me to find people demanding that we rearm the Chinese Nationalists and enter into a war with Red China instead of letting China settle her own affairs. Perhaps the troubles between the Chinese Nationalists and the Communists can be settled peacefully, but, however they are settled, if any help is needed it should be asked for through the United Nations. We should not take action alone, it seems to me, by giving aid or comfort to either faction.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL