My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

Text Size: Small Text Normal Text Large Text Larger Text

NEW YORK, Friday—Here I am back in New York City and I can't say I like it. Of course, I was down for two nights during the holidays, but except for them I have stayed in the country all the time since the Wednesday before Christmas.

The snow is cleaner there and the trees, when they were coated with ice, were very beautiful. Now the ice has melted and the branches have sprung back into their normal positions and I do not think they have been hurt as much as I feared they would be.

The melting snow suddenly left us bare fields and much fog and dampness the last day or so. In spite of that I loved it and I revelled in my walks with the Scottie dogs.

I also made a start on my annual tidying up of my book shelves, finding places for new books which had been lying around on the floor or piled up on the tables. I try to arrange so that both my own house and my guest house have an equal share of the kind of books that one reads all the time and the new books that one wants to read and may find time to glance through when one is a guest. I also give away a number of books but always regretfully!

Wednesday afternoon I went over to West Point to speak at the second meeting of the forum on international affairs which is now one of the student activities in the winter period. They invite their speaker to hold forth in the late afternoon for three-quarters of an hour and then to answer questions for 15 minutes.

The cadets entertain the speaker at their mess for dinner and they are very proud of their Wednesday night meal of steak and ice cream. It certainly was a delicious steak. In the lounge after dinner for about an hour, just the members of the forum sit around and ask questions. I think there must have been 50 or 60 boys in the room.

The questions were among the most intelligent I have heard in any university.

I found the whole experience interesting and delightful and I hope the cadets got something out of it and that they will have many good speakers during this season.

The news from Korea is very sad. The United Nations forces are again in retreat and this time it looks like a pretty serious situation. The committee that tried to bring about a ceasefire has reported that it has been unsuccessful.

Is it time for the U.N. to reassert that they are opposed to aggression?

At the present time the U.N. may not have the force necessary to put down aggression, but the moral judgment of the great majority of the peoples of the world should be firmly spoken in opposition to the kind of aggression which the North Koreans, now supported by the Red Chinese armies, have put over on the South Koreans. The instigator of all this, of course, is the Soviet Union, which does no fighting with her own troops but which keeps up the fiction that she is for peace and that China and the North Koreans are "liberating" the South Koreans.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL