My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK Tuesday—Just as the Chinese Communists reached this country the quiet that reigned in North Korea was broken by the resumption of a major attack. This does not augur very well for the desire of either Russia or the Chinese Communists to come to a real understanding with the rest of the free world.

It was the Russian delegate in the Political Committee who charged the accusation of United States aggression against China in his speech on Monday. That is as it should be, for it shows us at least where the wellspring of all our troubles is. The Chinese Communists were not the ones who brought these accusations; they were voiced by the Soviet Union first!

There was great excitement when the Chinese Communists arrived in Lake Success. In the lounge at one moment it seemed as though all cameras were focused on them. They must be fairly short in stature, for I could not even get a glimpse of them from where I stood on the outskirts of the crowd. Though we spent the day in the same building I have not as yet seen them.

Someone who was at the Political Committee session all morning told me that they seemed very quiet and not particularly imposing. They sat with expressionless faces through the whole of the Soviet speech as well as the short answer given by United States delegate John Foster Dulles. That sounds completely in character. Though I am sure they will continue to attract considerable attention, I doubt if they will court it.

I am surprised to find how quickly New York City has returned to normal after last Saturday's storm. One or two banks along the parkway to Lake Success have a good many uprooted trees, just as I noticed there were a good many evergreens uprooted on the Taconic Parkway, but otherwise everything seemed normal.

From my windows in the Park Sheraton, I look over many roofs and a number of television aerials, and on the whole they seem to have stood up pretty well through the blow! One of my advisers at the U.N. told me that on Saturday morning on two occasions in crossing the street, he found himself first putting his hands against the nearest automobile to keep himself from being blown into the path of another and, next, clinging to the railing alongside a building to keep from being blown down the block. His eyeglasses were blown off into space, never to be found.

I have been asked by a young newspaperwoman from the Middle West if she can join me one morning as I leave the hotel and stay with me for the whole day to check on my activities. I am gladly accepting her companionship for one day, but I think she will find it rather dull in spots and perhaps before the end of the day rather wearying. I could not submit to such trailing ordinarily, but being at the U.N. makes it easier.

I wonder whether anything interesting in the way of a story will come out of it to make her effort worthwhile. But she must be the judge of that!

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL