My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Friday—I want to devote my column today to a man who made a remarkable place for himself as a lawyer and in a number of fields in which he had a deep interest.

He believed passionately in civil liberties, in justice for all men. He loved human beings and had a sensitive and sympathetic approach to the problems of humanity. There was a calm strength about him that made those who came in contact with him feel surer of their own strength. He was never harsh in his judgment of others. In the years that I knew him I don't think I ever heard him say a disagreeable thing about anybody. Yet he understood people very well, and he knew the weaknesses of human nature and he could fight against those who were evil.

A life such as his leaves a radiance behind. No one will forget what he stood for and many will draw strength from him, even though he is no longer here to stand by their side.

His family was greatly blessed and for that reason the loss they have sustained is deeper and more difficult to bear. It must seem hard indeed to the older members of that family to face life without his sure guidance and understanding. He seemed very young to me and I grieve that another power for good should have been taken from us in a time when our country needs its valiant men. We can but hope that in his memory those who did better than their best in his presence will rise to even greater heights because they cannot bear to see the things he cared for really suffer.

At the time when my uncle, President Theodore Roosevelt, died, his sister, Mrs. Douglas Robinson, said in a poem picturing his ascent to Heaven: "Valiant for truth has come," and the bugles of Heaven rang out to greet him.

As the spirit of Louis S. Weiss crossed to the Great Beyond, the bugles must have rung out loudly for "valiant for truth" he always was. One cannot believe that his influence for all that was good and true will not be with us still.

The U.N. General Assembly will finally pass a resolution today directing the Economic and Social Council to direct the Human Rights Commission to study and to consider and to include in the first Covenant of Human Rights a rather appalling number of things during the five weeks of their spring meeting.

Sometimes I think the members of Committee #3, who have labored over this comprehensive resolution for so many weeks, must have had their tongues in their cheeks. In view of their own difficulties in formulating these in very general terms, it is interesting to see what they think can be accomplished by the Human Rights Commission which must put down on paper texts that are clearly and precisely stated, in language that is suitable for a treaty. And it must do it all in five weeks time!

Now we take up in Committee #3 the question of freedom of information. I hope the committee works with extreme rapidity because we still have two other questions which must be covered before the end of the session.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL