My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Thursday—Now that the election returns are all in, all of us will be analyzing the results for a long time to come.

I was sorry my son, James, lost out in California because I know when you work very hard to win an election, it is always a disappointment even though you may be entirely prepared for such an event. I can recall the 1920 election when my husband ran for Vice President. We all knew he would be defeated, but even then there was a little letdown afterwards.

Fortunately for all of us, however, political defeats are only temporary disappointments. We start again after a short rest on the real business of living, and instead of being a candidate we just become good, average citizens.

There is one great advantage in belonging to the party that is not in power. You can sit on the sidelines and criticize. And you can always find things to criticize. But as long as you are not in a position to run things, no one can blame you for what goes on.

I felt particularly disappointed that Chester Bowles should be defeated, because he had given the State of Connecticut really good service. But, being a good man, he will soon be needed and called on, I'm sure, for good men are too few in both parties.

There is a growing interest in the schools today in trying to develop among the children an understanding that democracy is something we live by—something we must learn as children in order to respect human rights and freedoms and become good citizens.

Some of our schools are putting on programs to teach consideration among the young people of the rights set forth in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, showing them how this Declaration must be applied in their daily lives. These young people who are shortly going to run the country need to realize that no matter how many laws are passed within nations or even in the United Nations, it is only as people in their hearts feel the desire to live up to human rights and to respect civil liberties that they can become a reality and a force in every community.

Last night I went to see "Call Me Madam" in which Ethel Merman is supposed to impersonate Mrs. Perle Mesta. I cannot say that I noticed any resemblance, but it was an amusing evening and I think will be enjoyed by everyone who is in need of a little relaxation.

I am beginning to think that, as a political force, labor is somewhat uncertain as a backer. But when it sticks to its duty toward the workingman it seems to get better cooperation among its members.

I have been interested for many years in the New York Women's Trade Union League. It runs a clubhouse on Lexington Avenue near 34th Street where women meet to discuss the problems of organizing women and of obtaining better conditions of labor. They also have an educational program there which has given many girls opportunities for improvement, some along educational lines and some for the development of hobbies.

Every year this group gives a benefit and this year, on December 6, their benefit will take place at the Martin Beck theatre where "Ring Around the Moon" will be playing. They are now selling seats for this annual show and if you are interested in helping the women of the labor movement to progress, this is one of the best outlets there is.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL