My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Wednesday—The weather was fine yesterday and one felt sure that everyone who could get to the polls would certainly go and vote. My United Nations chauffeur remarked that it was a great day, so I asked him if he had already voted and he said, certainly, he had been up at six o'clock. That was encouraging, for you hear so much about people who don't bother to cast their vote on Election Day. You realize it does mean something to some of us.

I was sorry to see yesterday evening that my old friend, Oscar of the Waldorf, had died at the age of eighty-four. I did not even know his full name until I saw it last night. Oscar Tschirky, after his retirement a few years ago, had come up to a cottage in New Paltz, New York, across the river from where I live, to spend his remaining years in peace and quiet. He had probably entertained as many dignitaries as anyone else in the country and I never saw him anything but courteous and kind. Many people have missed him since he left the Waldorf, and, in fact, I rarely go there without thinking how pleasant it used to be to be greeted by him. He was like an old friend.

It is comforting to see that the Red advance in North Korea is slowing up. We will gather our forces together and try to bring this present war to a close and the United Nations will make its decisions calmly and quietly when the Security Council meets.

Nearly everyone heard Governor Dewey in his extraordinary television marathon before Election Day. He must have felt it necessary to show how strong and vigorous he is, since his running partner for the United States Senate, Joe R. Hanley was obliged to stay in the hospital and was not even able to cast his vote.

My youngest son and his wife arrived in New York City Sunday night from California and he said he had taken a bet on his oldest brother in his race against Governor Warren.

It will be interesting to see how the country feels about a number of things when we have had time enough to analyze the vote in this election.

At least in Franklin, Jr.'s district the people decided they would have him again as their Congressman. I know that he will deeply appreciate this vote of confidence and loyalty and will continue to try to give them the best service of which he is capable.

I am also thankful that Senator Lehman has been returned to Washington. I feel it most important that the Senate of the United States should have as many members as possible who are fearless and firm in their stand for democracy and freedom. It gives one a sense of confidence to know that a man of such ability and integrity as Senator Lehman will represent the State of New York in Washington during the next six years.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL