My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Tuesday—It is rather anxious news that we are obliged to bring before the United Nations—the actual entry into the war in Korea of the Chinese Communists. It clarifies, however, for many of our own people, who were so anxiously hoping we could recognize the Chinese Communist government, why it is impossible to do so as long as they are aiding an aggressor.

I understand very well the longing certain people have in this country to finish with the war and get started doing a constructive job for peace. I frequently have letters saying how much they regret the money that is being spent in destruction—money that could be used to rehabilitate Korea and show what we could do to set that country on its feet again, with the aid of our technical advice and assistance. Of course, only after the United Nations has established military superiority will it be possible to think of the other things that we want to do.

I feel more and more strongly every day that there should be an overall board of strategy sitting in Washington to view our own global situation from the economic, military and spiritual point of view. Once that is honestly faced on all three sides, then we could meet with the other free democracies of the world and ask them to face their own situations, taking into consideration the same world viewpoint. Then we could offer the U.N. a really complete survey and plan for the best use of our strength along all these different lines.

I was interested in two votes in the General Assembly yesterday. One directed the Human Rights Commission to give priority to the completion of the first covenant for presentation to the next General Assembly. The other quite evidently showed that the committee as a whole did not wish to give a mandate to the commission as to what rights must be included in this first covenant. I am sure the latter will make the commission consider with great care the desires expressed in the committee because it does leave them greater freedom and, therefore, greater responsibility to represent the views expressed by the delegates in Committee #3.

I was glad last week to have a few minutes with Doris Fleeson, one of my co-columnists whom I have been reading with particular interest during the last few weeks while she was travelling around the country looking over the chances of the various candidates.

I was interested, also, last night in reading one of our metropolitan newspapers to find complete recommendation for the election of the Republican candidates in New York State and New York City. In the morning I had read in one of our great independent papers an almost identical list except in the case of United States Senator, where Senator Lehman was preferred to Lieut. Gov. Joe R. Hanley. In the evening paper I found the editorial columns actually taking an excursion into Connecticut and advising the voters to vote against the Democratic gubernatorial candidate and for the Republican. It really encourages me considerably because I usually find that the majority of papers very rarely are on the winning side.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL