My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Monday—The United Council of Church Women celebrated World Community Day last Friday. This is an effort to highlight on one day in the year the work that is being carried on by church women to bring about a real sense of community responsibility and have it function every day in the year.

These women concentrate on the Commandment, "Love Thy Neighbor." They do not question that they have a responsibility for their brother—be he a refugee from overseas, a member of a minority group or their own blood brother. On this one day they join together in special united services that stress the responsibility of the individual for his neighbor and our nation's responsibility for non-self-governing nations.

Besides such things as clothes for people overseas, they ask everyone for a contribution. This contribution is used to support the work for peace of the United Council of Church Women. Also, the most urgent needs of the refugees are met out of these offerings.

I went to the country Friday night and thus had two nights of "outdoor" sleeping on my porch. I enjoyed, too, two early morning walks with the dogs, one on Saturday and one on Sunday morning. The leaves are nearly gone and one can see the bare skeletons of the trees against the sky. The air was warm and rainy but summer lingered still, and it was not until I got back to New York City on Sunday afternoon that I suddenly felt the first real cold blast of wind when I went out in the late afternoon.

Being the last Sunday before Election Day, I had the four candidates for Mayor of New York City on my television program. Questions were put to them by three lovely ladies and one young male first voter who had come down from Harvard to cast this first and most important vote.

A letter I received from a woman the other day told me she thought most of the people who asked me questions showed very little interest in the really important affairs of state that were before us at the present time. Of course, she's entitled to her opinion, but I thought the questions put to the candidates for Mayor showed that the average public was keeping very close tabs on what was being said in this campaign.

I am always rather glad when a campaign is over. This is one of the ways in which democracy functions, but which never has a great appeal to me. It has always seemed to me that the meetings candidates attend are, in large part, packed with their own followers who would vote for them in any case. It is very rare that those voters who are uncertain or opposed attend the meetings held by candidates of the opposition party.

As a rule, instead of giving us a true picture of what they think can be accomplished if they are elected to office, they tell us all the things they hope to do even though they know very well that it is impossible to achieve the perfection they picture.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL