My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK, Sunday—I had a very touching letter the other day, accompanied by a money order, from a group of displaced persons in Bridgeport, Conn. It demonstrated, I thought, how people who have suffered can appreciate the suffering of others and, in spite of the fact that they themselves do not as yet have a great deal, will be generous with what they have.

The group, who are Lithuanian in origin, wrote: "We who live in this country of the Four Freedoms and the Bill of Rights, a country which has given shelter to the homeless and possibilities of existence for the destitute, feel that it is our duty and obligation to help those who suffer." The money order accompanying their letter I was asked to forward for the benefit of the rehabilitation of the people in South Korea.

I am sure that many people view as truly regrettable the additional forces which have suddenly appeared in North Korea and which are putting up a desperate last stand. We had hoped that the bloodshed was drawing to a close and that the constructive phase of building Korea into a unified nation might soon begin.

In the United Nations there is a discussion going on about the aid to the Arab refugees. Emphasis is now being placed on a program which will help to resttle and re-integrate these people, either in the homes which they left or in new homes in some of the Near Eastern states. All of us hope that this can be done as quickly as possible, for any length of time spent under the conditions of camp life is deteriorating to the people who are forced to live under it.

It is encouraging to find that there is a wider acceptance of projects which will finally remove these people from the relief rolls, where the refugees are concerned, than there was for projects of a similar nature where the children were concerned. Relief supplies cannot come forever from the United States, and that is why the permanent programs make a greater appeal to most of us in this country.

Tomorrow, Tuesday, will be Election Day and in every community throughout this nation people will vote for officials who will serve in local, state or national capacities. I hope that every voter will realize the importance of casting his ballot with a great deal of care, considering carefully the character of the man for whom he votes and the program which that man has offered during his campaign.

I shall be watching anxiously, of course, the returns from California, as well as those in the 20th Congressional District in New York City.

This must be a year of anxiety for the Republicans. The people in California will decide whether Governor Warren has given them all they desire or whether they wish to try the Democratic party and a younger man. Clear across the country, in the State of New York, the national leader of the Republican party will watch the voters make their decision as to which party they think will give them the best administration in this state. In Ohio Senator Taft, who is probably the leading Republican, running for the United States Senate, will also be awaiting the verdict of the people of his state.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL