My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Friday—On United Nations Day, October 24, in Boston, Gertrude Lawrence at the U.N. Day celebration there, likened the organization to a five-year-old child and made one of the most understanding and charming speeches.

Here in New York City I think one of the most valuable things done by John Golden, chairman of the New York City celebration, was the competition which was set up in the schools and which Mr. Golden tells me was most successful in making the real slogan of the day—U.N. & U = Peace—understandable to many children. Mrs. Mary Kennedy, Assistant Superintendent of the Board of Education, reported that 30,000 children sat down and tried to express themselves on the United Nations, patriotism and peace.

The winning essay was written by Elayne Wade, and I am quoting it here because I think it will have real significance to many adults as well as children.

"Final Entry
Oct. 13, 1950
J.H.S. 43, Man. Elayne Wade
Class 9-2 OCTOBER 4, 1950
U.N. & U = PEACE

"The house I live in on 124th Street resembles the United Nations. People that reside there are of many nationalities—Chinese, Spanish, French, Greek, American, and others. Here we have people from all parts of the world living under one roof! Serving one God in many different ways! Being educated in schools and churches to love their neighbors, to fight intolerance, to uproot racial discrimination.

"The world is your house, the Heavens form your roof, the people are the tenants, and God watches over us all. You and you and you, wherever you are in this world, live like good neighbors in love, affection and kindness for each other. Then you will be living proof of our formula U.N. & U = PEACE for all eternity!"

There are a great many people in this country who are interested in what is happening to our Indian population. We are entering into a new phase of thinking, which I believe is beneficial. It seems to me as we look into the future, we must plan for the integration into our communities of all our minority groups. This is a long-range program and one that cannot be accomplished quickly. It requires men of courage and integrity to carry it out with justice to the Indians as well as to the states in which many of them will live.

"House Resolution #490 outlines the objectives and provides the authorization and means to start an effective and integrated job of programming."

This last sentence is a quotation from a statement of policy by the Secretary of the Interior, Oscar L. Chapman. I think everyone who has the interest of the Indian at heart should be grateful that Secretary Chapman and Dillon Myer are going to direct the initial stages of this new policy. This must, of course, be done in cooperation with Indian groups as well as local and state governments.

In order to carry out this new policy successfully continued interest on the part of Federal agencies and voluntary organizations, both local and national, must be retained. It is a great relief to me to know that something constructive is at last under way. But I am anxious that it move slowly and be done well, with due regard for the preservation of Indian culture, their arts and crafts and the interest of the older people for whom changes are most difficult.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL