My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Tuesday—As the United Nations does not give us a holiday on Election Day, I mailed off my absentee ballot last week. I discovered that I have been thinking so much about international things and have done so little in state and national politics that I knew very few of the people who are running on the state Democratic ticket. Naturally the city candidates are not in my bailiwick, since I vote in Hyde Park.

But I voted with conviction and enthusiasm for the two people I do know on the Democratic ticket—Senator Herbert H. Lehman and James Bourne. Senator Lehman has commanded my affection and admiration and his short term in the Senate has enhanced his stature. I hope that he will be returned to serve his state in our highest legislative body. Mr. Bourne, who is the Democratic candidate for Congress in our district, will serve us well, if elected. But he will have to capture the support of many Republicans in our light Democratic district.

Aside from these two, I cannot speak with much personal knowledge. I feel strongly however, that the Democratic party, as a whole, has given this state in the past its most forward-looking legislation and administrations and I hope the ticket will carry the state.

I am delighted to see that Prime Minister Hans Hedtoft of Denmark feels that the democracies of Europe have been sufficiently strengthened so that even the populations of countries which suffered aggressions in the last war and realized the difficulties of defense are now convinced of the growing strength of democracy. All the peoples of these countries are firm in their determination to remain strong and free.

The more that feeling grows the safer the democracies of Europe will be. It should certainly bring great satisfaction to the people of the United States to feel that this sense of confidence in the United Nations and the peoples' determination to fight for their freedom is universal among the democracies of Europe.

In Committee #3 yesterday we all observed a minute of silence to show our sympathy for the Swedish people and our sorrow over the news of the death of King Gustav V of Sweden. He reigned a long time over his people and endeared himself to them. He was an able ruler, devoted to his country and admired by all those who worked with him. Every American, I feel sure, associated himself in spirit with the President's message of condolence and sympathy.

I saw a most interesting English play last night, called "Black Chiffon," by Lesley Storm. Flora Robson does the part of the wife and mother remarkably well. It is really a very difficult part, but she is admirably supported by the whole cast, particularly Anthony Ireland who acts the part of the psychiatrist. I thought Patricia Marmont, as the married daughter, played her part very sympathetically. The very normal ending is almost a surprise. One finds on going away that one has really lived through a family crisis and hopes that the family is going to succeed in coming out with more understanding and a more serene existence when the mother returns.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL