My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Friday—I was interested to read the other night that Soviet Foreign Minister Andrei Vishinsky explained the use of the veto in the Security Council of the United Nations by Russia against the renomination of Secretary-General Trygve Lie by saying that he was "obviously one-sided and totally unfit for the job." It is extremely difficult to understand how this question of the Secretary-General can hang fire so long. A decision must soon be made that will be agreeable to everyone so as to allow the secretariat to settle down with some sense of continuity.

When a great organization such as the U.N. is uncertain about its leadership, there is bound to be a certain amount of disorganization, particularly if this disorganization lasts over a long period. The quicker this question is settled the better it will be for everyone concerned.

I have been sent a most interesting book dealing with one of the real problems facing the United States today. Written by Robert H. Kinzer and Edward Sagarin, it is called, "The Negro in American Business—The Conflict between Separatism and Integration."

The problems facing the Negro in this country are never entirely separate. Whether they are personal or professional or spiritual problems, certain common problems develop in almost every field. The Negro is a part of America and yet he finds himself so often denied that sense of complete belonging, which is real integration into the whole pattern of life. This study of the Negro in business is stimulating and valuable to anyone who is concerned in honestly understanding and finding solutions not just for the Negro problem but for the problem of every citizen of the United States who cares about his country and its unity.

While I am on the subject of books, I have just obtained an autographed copy of John Steinbeck's new play-novelette, "Burning Bright." It is a play in story form and has been playing on Broadway, though I have not had a chance to see it. Mr. Steinbeck writes with power and imagination and he certainly has a gift for making people think.

Some of you may be looking for a book that will be enjoyed at Christmas time by all the family, particularly if you are a family that likes to sing together and there is someone among you who can play the piano. If so, you will find the Trapp Family Book of Christmas Songs, collected and arranged by Franz Wasner, to be a Christmas gift for the whole of your family, and you may be singing some of the songs all the year round

There is another book I have enjoyed very much lately and that is John Mason Brown's "Still Seeing Things." This is a collection of essays. I still lean to essays which is perhaps a sign of my old–fashioned taste in literature. I enjoyed particularly what he wrote about Charles Lamb, but when you really enjoy the whole of a book it is difficult to pick out any particular part that you enjoy more than any other.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL