My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Wednesday—It seems sad that the North Koreans have not seen fit to surrender and, by so doing, prevent further bombing and more killing of people in the northern area. It was quite evident that unless there was a prompt surrender it was essential that the United Nations forces make sure that this Korean war was really won. This must have been completely evident not only to the North Koreans but to their obvious backers, the Soviet Union and the Chinese Communists. Certainly, it must become clear to all those concerned that the United Nations must control the whole of Korea. The one guarantee of peace in the future lies in a unified Korea. No rehabilitation can be undertaken until peace has been restored to the whole area.

We are all so concerned about international questions that we are paying less attention than usual to the campaigns that are getting into full swing in our own country at present. It seems to me it is very important for us—particularly because we are so preoccupied with foreign affairs—to see to it that the representatives sent to Congress are people who have a real understanding of what our leadership means to the world and what our actions in Congress can do to influence the world situation.

Senator Herbert H. Lehman in our own New York State is up for reelection and it is evident that the people of this state should give him close attention in this coming campaign. He has served the people of the state as Lieutenent Governor and as Governor. In both positions he was a good and faithful public servant and held the confidence and respect of the people. Since he became one of our Senators his record of votes is an outstanding record. He has been fearless and wise, and it would be a great loss to this state if by chance the voters did not return him to office. I feel sure this will be recognized by the electorate. No one will be left in doubt as to where he stands, as he is speaking out clearly in the campaign.

We had long arguments yesterday afternoon in Committee #3 on what seemed to be minor resolutions. I left the meeting room at 6:30 and went to New Hyde Park to make a speech on "Education in a Community School."

I was surprised to find New Hyde Park was so nearby. The section where I dined with Mr. and Mrs. Leo Perlis is in one of those completely new little Long Island communities. Four years ago it was sparsely settled, but today it has charming houses, lawns, shrubs and growing trees.

This is a young community where young parents are bringing up their children and they have a keen sense of responsibility and interest in all that concerns the children. One of their concerns undoubtedly is how this generation and the next will back the United Nations in its efforts to bring about a peaceful world.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL