My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Monday—I came down from Hyde Park Sunday morning for our first television show of this season. I had done an interview with Secretary of State Dean Acheson on Friday, but the Hon. Isador Lubin, Senator John Sherman Cooper from Kentucky, and the Hon. Benjamin Cohen were on hand for the in-person part to answer questions. What we hoped to do was to explain how Secretary Acheson's proposals for peace, which recently were made to the United Nations, tied in with the whole situation in Korea and the future actions there of the U.N.

As usual, the time seemed all too short. I hope though, that what was said at least clarified some questions in people's minds. For the first program we had to choose the subject and prepare the questions. From now on I hope our telecast will be a clearinghouse for our viewers. We invite questions and later we want people from the audience to come on the program so that others can see them asking their questions either of me or of some qualified expert that I am able to get who will know more about the subject than I can find out.

I am hoping too, to bring before you some of the people you see out at the United Nations when they televise the meetings. I don't know whether the meeting of Committee #1, in which apparently they had considerable confusion recently, was televised. But those who answer questions on my program will do so in a more serene and placid atmosphere.

The aim and object, of course, of interesting the citizens of the United States in both national and international situations, is to help bring about peace in the world. We are the leading democracy. We are the strongest nation from the economic standpoint. We may be hated or we may be loved. But both those who hate us and those who love us know that we are an important factor in the lives of people all over the world.

I know there are many people who feel as I do. The one thing they want is to reach a point where men will sit down around a table and settle their difficulties without recourse to force. Killing the youth of many nations when they are drawn into a war is a crime against civilization.

I have just read a book for which my daughter Anna, wrote the foreword. It brings poignantly home this horror of sending our youth to war. The book is called "Your Son and Mine" and was written by Aramais Hovsepian. It doesn't take long to read and you almost feel you know this little family.

Incidentally, I saw an advance copy of another book, which will be released next week. This book, though written by a doctor, has been made somewhat less technical and more personal by the collaboration with a woman. I smiled when I first heard that my daughter, Anna, was collaborating with Dr. Leo M. Doyle on the book, called "Your Pregnancy." And now that I have read the review copy I find myself a little surprised at Anna's ability to join in making this book so readable and so instructive. She should be very proud of this joint achievement. I think that any young woman going through the months before her baby comes will like to have this book at hand to read the chapters that deal with the particular difficulty that may be facing her at the moment.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL