My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Wednesday—After a short meeting of our United Nations delegation yesterday morning I took Lady Stella Reading and Miss Owen, who is travelling with her, to lunch with John Golden at Sardi's. They wanted to meet Mr. Golden and to see that rather unique restaurant where one sees so many people of the theatre world.

No one had told me that the afternoon session had been put off until 3 o'clock and so I hurried away from luncheon with my two British guests and dashed out to Flushing to find we were among the first people to arrive. This gave me an opportunity not only to get my guests good seats for the afternoon but to show them around the buildings.

At 3 o'clock the place was teeming with people. I don't think there have ever been so many guests. Every seat was filled and the photographers were scurrying around taking pictures, particularly of the Foreign Ministers. Great Britain's Foreign Minister Ernest Bevin, sat across the aisle from me and I was glad to see Mrs. Bevin with him. The French Prime Minister, Robert Schuman, was there as well as Russian Foreign Minister Andrei Y. Vishinsky, whom the photographers could hardly wait to receive.

In opening the 1950 General Assembly session, Foreign Minister Carlos P. Romulo of the Philippines, the outgoing Assembly president, was wise enough not to make a long speech reviewing every thing that had happened in the world. He is a remarkably good presiding officer, and the afternoon meeting which might have bogged down and left us with very little accomplished was carried right on to a successful conclusion, largely through General Romulo's ability, tact and firmness.

The expected resolutions on the seating of the Communist Chinese delegates came promptly. India presented a resolution almost at once. The Soviet Union first presented one against the seating of the Nationalist delegates and later proposed the seating of the Chinese Communist delegates. I must say that Mr. Vishinsky was remarkably temperate, really almost conciliatory. When he did use rough language he carefully explained that he was quoting from an American general.

We ended the day rather late, after having passed a Canadian resolution that suggested the appointment of a committee to study the whole question of eligibility of nations. The Chinese Nationalist delegates will occupy their seats at least until the study is completed.

We also elected the president of the General Assembly to serve through this coming year. A former Foreign Minister of Iran, Nasrollah Entezam was the choice by a fairly large majority. The ballot is secret and cast by the head of each nation's delegation. I was glad I did not have to vote because I liked both the leading candidates and would have found it difficult to choose between them.

Secretary of State Dean Acheson gave a cocktail party, which was supposed to start at 6:30, for the top members of the delegations but I do not think anyone reached there much before 7:15. I had to come home right afterwards to a small family dinner and I was glad the day was done. The first days of a new session always seem to me rather tiring.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL