My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Monday—We came down from Hyde Park on Sunday a little earlier than usual because I had to be at the Waldorf-Astoria at 8 o'clock for a meeting and a reception of the United States delegation to the U.N. General Assembly. The affair was given by the American Association for the United Nations. Representatives of the various non-governmental organizations were invited to meet us and I functioned in two capacities. I am a member of the board of the American Association for the United Nations as well as being one of our delegates to the General Assembly.

As a rule, the representatives of the non-governmental organizations are familiar to those of us who have served at a number of General Assembly sessions, but the first few days of a new meeting are confusing until we get to know our new colleagues from other nations' delegations. The personnel of these delegations may change with a change of governments or, in some cases, delegates resign because they feel they cannot fulfill the rather arduous duties. However, there always are a certain number of old friends and it is a joy to meet them again.

Over the weekend at Hyde Park we had some unexpected guests. Dr. Harry B. Friedgood of Los Angeles came up on Friday night. He had been in Paris, France, less than six hours before. The Dowager Marchioness of Reading and a young friend, Miss Owen, are in this country for a brief holiday and we were delighted to have them for a little visit.

On Sunday three young businessmen who are this year's "Nottingham Fellows" came to lunch with us. They travel for three or four months in this country to study the types of businesses in which they are engaged in England. The City of Nottingham provides these three fellowships in memory of my husband. These gentlemen will shortly start on their travels and on their return I hope they will stay with us for a weekend and tell me what their impressions of the United States are.

At three o'clock on Sunday in the library I greeted a group of students from Asia and Europe who are here under many different auspices. They were spending the weekend with American families in White Plains, N.Y. Most of them are graduate students and have been here only a few days. They have nearly a year before them and I hope it will be a pleasant and useful year of study.

If you want to see a most charming chimpanzee you will find him on the cover of a book called, "Chimp on My Shoulder" by Bill Westley. The drawings are by Paul Bacon.

This is a book of adventure, yet the author, while on this African assignment, was cured of a heart condition. This is a little hard to believe but it seemed to have done the trick. I think even those who do not want to travel in Africa will find the book interesting.

Part of Mr. Westley's job was to capture animals alive to use for scientific purposes for the Anthropoid Ape Research Foundation of Florida. It was a risky task, but on the way he learned much about the people of Africa and this is valuable to the world today in the search for greater understanding. I hope that many people will find a few hours spent with "Chimp" delightful and entertaining.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL