My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Thursday—Yesterday morning I reached home, almost on time, all the way from San Francisco by air! I certainly spent two busy days out there on the coast. But hard as these trips seem at the time, in retrospect I am always glad that I had the chance even to have a few words with many different people from many parts of the country.

For instance, on the way out I sat beside a young man, a soldier in our Air Force, who was going to California for the first time. He was deeply impressed as we flew over the Grand Canyon. He had his orders to go overseas; just where, he did not know. He was restless, excited; perhaps he had just said good-bye to his family. We talked of many things and I wished him well when we parted and felt again the pride in the youth of America that represents us today in so many faraway places.

On my way back, I talked with Charles E. Wilson of the General Electric Co. and we heard the news of the resignation of Louis Johnson, Secretary of Defense, and the appointment by the President of General George C. Marshall. No one has a higher regard for General Marshall than I, and I think the country should be deeply grateful to him for taking on this very strenuous task. For him and for Mrs. Marshall I feel a little sad. It seems almost too much to ask of a man who has already given so much of his life in public service.

I spoke about the United Nations at a luncheon in San Francisco on Tuesday. At several meetings I spoke for and with Helen Gahagan Douglas and my son, James Roosevelt. Mrs. Douglas is running on the Democratic ticket for senator and my son, James, is running against Governor Earl Warren as the Democratic nominee for Governor. I had time also to see some other members of my family and a number of other people.

I want to tell you about one particularly interesting thing that I discovered in Hollywood. It is an idea that might spread to other parts of the country and might become a Godsend to many women. It is an organization called the Baby-Sitters Guild, Inc. The founder is Mrs. Gene Hanner.

A portrait painter who has painted many of the crowned heads of Europe, Mrs. Hanner became so interested in the problem of finding work for women over 45 that she gave up her painting to answer this problem. The result is a 24-hour service now available to all those in the Los Angeles area needing baby-sitters, caretakers for invalids or companions for elderly people.

Mrs. Hanner keeps a roster of responsible older women—retired nurses, governesses, teachers and social workers. No women is eligible for membership in this guild if she has a husband or a full-time position or an income that gives her more than fair support.

Doesn't this sound like something that would be useful to start elsewhere?

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL