My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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CAMPOBELLO ISLAND, New Brunswick, Thursday—Mixed news from Korea yesterday morning left me worrying all day. We seem to bomb successfully in the rear but still expect a major attack on our thin lines. Our troops have withstood so much harrassment around Taegu that they must long for the re-enforcements promised from Hong Kong.

Not having electricity in the cottage here, and not having brought a radio that works on a battery, every morning, I go out before breakfast, start my car to be sure my battery won't run down, turn on the radio and listen to the news.

I have not driven a great deal since I arrived on the island. In the years when I spent long summers here we always walked or went by boat so I find it hard to remember to use the car, besides, when one has driven across the island to Herring Cove and up to the head harbor end of the island, one has been about everywhere that one can go by car, whereas by boat there are endless trips to take. One can go up the St. Croix River to Calais, or stop at St. Andrews and see the fashionable world in the big hotel, and buy hand woven rugs and tweeds in the cottage industries shop which has flourished for many years. By now one can probably get some English china and pottery which was not available during the war, and is still not too plentiful in England itself. One can travel in a little boat among endless islands up the coast of Newfoundland, and even out to Grand Manan, and all the way around Campobello Island itself, joining the fishing fleet if one wants to fish.

The seining of a weir here is one of the sights no stranger should miss, for it takes one back to the days of the Bible as one watches the fisherman pulling up the seine and filling their dories with fish. One can stay in American waters and find endless picnic spots up the Denny River which flows down to the west of Eastport, as the St. Croix does on the east.

There is a little Indian village north of Eastport where the Indians still sell some of their baskets and other wares in the town, but on this visit I have not been to Eastport.

I am no happier about the way the Indians have been treated in this part of our country, than I am anywhere else in the United States. Had we done a really good job it seems to me that our Indians today would be educated; there would be no need of reservations; they would be fully capable of taking their places as citizens, and the tribes would have had full compensation for the lands they owned. Our inability to work out this small problem satisfactorily and fairly is one of the real blots on our history.

We don't seem to be able to deal with dependent people, and that is why I have always been anxious to see us admit Alaska and Hawaii as states. Once they are an integral part of our country we will have a completely different attitude toward them and their inhabitants. They will be fully represented in Congress and no other state's interests will be more important than theirs.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL