My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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CAMPOBELLO ISLAND, New Brunswick, Tuesday—Monday the weather began to clear in this part of the world, so I started out to see how bad a condition the road to the ferry was in and discovered that to leave the island by car was impossible. The stretch of road under construction is deep in mud, I sank in over my ankles so decided to abandon my immediate departure. I'm hoping for a few days of sun and wind which should allow me to leave next Thursday. Hurricane winds have missed us, and I think we will have some clear days as last night we had one of the wonderful sunsets for which the island is so famous.

There is no hay fever here as far as I know; no poison ivy to make you wary when you go berry picking; the blueberries are luxuriant and the little cranberries have a flavour quite different from those anywhere else. This sounds almost like a summer paradise, and it really is, but, like all earthly paradises, it has one drawback—when the wind blows from the West, there are strong whiffs of fertilizer from the Eastport factory which come across the water and are not at all agreeable.

Yesterday, one of my neighbors here from Boston handed me a little pamphlet addressed to Mr. Vishinsky. I enjoyed reading this and I wish it might reach the people in the Soviet Union, but that is one of our troubles, all the good things we say and write only reach ourselves. I can only hope that our performance will be so good in our Democratic countries that, little by little, the word may seep through that some of the things which have been said about democracy and capitalism cannot be true.

A very good thing has been done by the State Department and our President in naming a woman lawyer, a Negro of proved ability, as a member of our delegation to the United Nations General Assembly. This is recognition which any citizen would be proud to achieve, and I hope Mrs. Sampson is happy in her appointment. It is an important appointment to all of us however, not only because it will mean something to her race, but because this action by our government will speak louder than words in refuting some of the Soviet charges so frequently made against us. I welcome Mrs. Sampson among us as a colleague for herself, but also because she can prove that opportunity is open to all in our country, on an increasingly non-discriminatory basis.

This is important to our position in Asia and Africa today, almost as important as our victories in Korea. I feel that Mrs. Sampson will help us all in our delegation to remember that spiritual leadership is as important in this world crisis as the essential military and economic power.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL