My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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EASTPORT, Maine, Sunday—With Korean war news telling of difficulties these last few days, I am chiefly worried because I know we are less likely to accept diplomatic talks when, things are not coming our way. For the sake of Korea and Asia and of the USSR itself, I would like to see the North Koreans back at the starting line so that talks could go on around a table and not on battlefields.

Every day that we fight, bitterness grows among our people and we hold the government of the Soviets responsible. When you see our workers refusing to unload goods because they come from the USSR and our ship lines deciding not to carry Soviet goods, then we are getting aroused. We are slow to anger and I had always hoped that our opening wedge of understanding might be through trade, since we enjoy new and adventuresome business. But we are feeling more and more that the Soviets want war and confusion in the world and that only overwhelming force will prevent their aggressive attitude. We can build force, but we would rather spend our substance on making the lives of people happier and easier.

I was shocked to hear the recent statements made by a Republican Senator about Secretary of State Acheson. It would seem that partisanship was making the Senator forget the real instigator of trouble in Korea. In addition he was putting responsibility for certain conditions on one man, when the legislative branch should carry equal responsibility with the executive branch of the government. Those who so often banded together to defeat administration policies must bear some of the responsibility also, and not try to blame any one man or even any one party.

August 19 was the eightieth birthday of a great citizen of the United States. Bernard M. Baruch has served his country in many ways, in times of war and in times of peace. He has earned respect and gratitude from his fellow citizens, who trust his integrity and his judgment. He could rest on his laurels, secure in a good name and a worthy place in history, but instead he is putting his major effort now into a great new hospital where the handicapped people who have become his greatest concern can receive the treatment which may make life worth living for them. Few of us can do anything for Bernard Baruch, but those of us who have the honor to count him our friend can wish him many more years of usefulness in which to serve his fellow men. So, here is my heartfelt wish for health and happiness in the years to come.

Our two little boys have played Indians all way with headbands of gauze and feathers stuck all around their heads. This is ideal country for any imaginative child. The pines grow tall and the branches reach to the ground. The alder bushes make an impenetrable underbrush. The fog which has been blowing in and out ever since our arrival makes everything mysterious to those who are living as the children do, in a world of make-believe. Sometimes I think it would be good for grownups to dream they were living in the kind of world they really wanted. Even Mr. Malik of the Soviet Union might try to make it a reality.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL