My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK, Friday—It is, of course, disagreeable to read a headline as we did yesterday morning stating that the North Koreans had driven back our infantry, but if they had forty tanks they are probably far better equipped by the Russians than any troops that we have, as yet, been able to send in support of the South Koreans. It is always well to remember that democracies which have no intention of fighting themselves, or of aiding and abetting the fighting of other nations, never start with enough of anything in the field. If we look back into history the pattern of the present situation seems very familiar.

Germany had plenty of equipment. Her troops that aided Franco's troops in Spain were thoroughly equipped. Japan was well equipped. Only those of us who never intended to go to war suffered a temporary defeat, until our preparations were made for war instead of for peace.

It must be evident to all the world today that the protestations of the Soviets on the subject of peace are mere camouflage since they and they alone, provided the equipment now being used by the Northern Koreans. I wonder if they will realize that deeds speak louder than words. Disagreeable as temporary defeat may be, it means that the United States was living up to what it actually said when it assured the world that our country wanted peace. I hope the United Nations' flag will be carried with those of the other nations that take part in this present Korean difficulty, because one of the most important things we are doing is to show that the United Nations has staunch members who really intend to uphold its decisions.

While our minds turn primarily to the Far East I do not think we should forget that there is still a problem to be solved in Europe, which has not been answered by the developments in Korea. Europe may feel reassured because they know that the United Nations has strong backers in the United States and, in other great powers but, that cannot free the European people from anxiety. I hope the changes in government in France will not prevent continuing discussions in the Schuman plan. That plan is more important than ever to Europe today, because to create a European community there must be economic unity in Europe. The Dutch seem to have fully accepted this idea judging by some statements I have seen coming from their country, and there must be other countries who realize that no European country alone is safe, but that a United Europe can build enough strength to keep itself safe and free.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL