My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK, Thursday—The Korean situation is giving all the columnists plenty to write about. I can't write about military tactics since I know nothing about them, but it seems to me essential that the free peoples of the world must get together and make a determined stand against the type of incitement to war which has been going on under cover of a great propaganda campaign for peace.

When I was in Paris the Communists were writing on the walls asking people to sign a peace pledge. When the Soviets, the one great nation which could have an influence on the Northern Koreans, do nothing to bring about peace, then pleas broadcast elsewhere sound rather hollow. The USSR counts on taking over nations through the use of such weaklings as may believe communist propaganda. The Kremlin officials then depend on the individuals who desire personal power and see their chance of gaining it by communizing the people. In that freedom is lost, and a police state established before the majority of the people are aware of what has happened. The stand against such action has been made in Korea. The free people of the world did not want to make war but, now that they are committed, they will fight until they win, until peace is established and until the United Nations feel that when they speak their voice has strength behind it.

It is curious how, in less than 24 hours, you can leave one country and arrive in another and slip back into familiar scenes and routines so that it seems almost as though one had not been away. We actually left London at 8:30 in the evening, but we were in New York early enough the next morning in spite of a delay in Boston, to motor straight to Hyde Park and arrive there for lunch. A picnic by the pool had been planned and the children could hardly wait for the truck with the bags to arrive because they wanted to get into the water. My little dogs greeted me as though I were returning from a weekend, and fell into their normal ways only showing a little more reluctance to be separated for fear I would disappear again.

My son James and his family are all staying in my guest cottage.

On the Fourth of July some of us went down to join a buffet lunch party at Franklin and Sue's home. After lunch Franklin harnessed a small horse to a little two wheel go-cart which had come from my grandmother's place at Tivoli, and in which I had driven many times as a child. It was a little harder to get into than when I was a child, but I climbed in and we drove around the estate while Franklin brought me up to date on happenings in his particular areas of interest, during the month that I have been away. Finally I climbed out of the cart, rather ungracefully remembering how easily I used to jump out, but thinking it was the better part of wisdom I did not try that particular method in my old age! Because of the wet weather I expected to find the woods unbearable, but I walked with the dogs in moderate comfort every day and it is good to be home.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL