My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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PARIS, Thursday—It seems odd that when the Security Council is meeting on questions as important as the invasion of one part of a country by another, and when governments all over the world are deeply agitated, still, individuals must go about their daily lives and do the things they planned to do. Therefore we set out for Chartres, leaving Paris a little before eleven, lunching in the enchanting little village of Joui, in a restaurant called La Providence across from the village church. We sat in a little courtyard under an umbrella enjoying the sun and the flowers, which were in abundance everywhere around us. The troubled world seemed very far away, and yet, we only had to step out of the courtyard to see before us the monument to the men from this village who fell in World War I. Their names are inscribed on four sides of the stone shaft, and then below are the names of the men who died in World War II.

More has been written about Chartres than I could ever write, but coming back to this magnificent Gothic cathedral, for the first time in twenty odd years, I found it as great an experience in the realm of beauty as anything I know. We had a glimpse of the Chateau of Rambouillet as we drove down, and there is evidence everywhere of considerable destruction caused by the war.

Everyone is, of course, anxiously awaiting news of developments in the Far East.

The Communist papers here have printed a strange tale which, announced that the Southern Koreans invaded North Korea, and they followed that up with the screaming headline, "Seoul Liberated." One wonders how people can square with themselves such complete lies, but it makes one realize that deeds, and not words, must count in these situations.

Now that the United Nations has called on all nations to bring all possible pressure against the aggressor, and has ordered the North Korean armies to withdraw forces it is to be hoped that the Soviets will live up to their undertakings when they signed the Charter, and will join with other nations in protecting the freedom of South Korea as the United Nations Security Council has requested. They, more than anyone else, can bring pressure to bear on the Northern Korean armies, so the peace of the world depends largely on the action that will be taken by the Soviet Government.

On Tuesday afternoon we all visited Jo Davidson's studio. He has done a most remarkable head of my husband, chiselling it out of a great block of stone. I think it is the most lifelike portrait of my husband that I have seen. He has done one too of Harry Hopkins, but that was not done from life, and therefore there is something about it which does not seem to recall Harry as I knew him.

In the evening I went with Ambassador and Mrs. Bruce to the opening night of Martha Graham's appearances here. It was a most interesting performance and one which met with warm approval of the French audience, which is, at all times, an honest and critical one.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL