My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Friday—There are just a few of my readers who take an interest in the little orange lizards that come out on certain of our wood roads in summer. I noticed a few the other day. They are tiny this year, some are so small I can hardly see them, though their color is as brilliant as ever. Last year I saw very few, and even though this year has been so wet—and I believe they like the mud—they seem to be dying out, because when I first noticed them I had to pick my way along the road to avoid stepping on them. Now it requires minute inspection of the ground to find them. Perhaps some one else can explain to me what is happening to the orange lizards in this part of the world.

The rain stayed with us most of yesterday. It was my last day in Hyde Park for over a month so a busy one. In the morning I went down to our excellent department store, Luckey-Platt, in Poughkeepsie, and arranged for some furniture to be re-upholstered while I am away. I bought a few things for the stone cottage which my guests should find convenient.

My niece, Eleanor Roosevelt Elliott, who is a sculptress has sent me a little bronze figure for the fountain in the patio. This inspired me to put in some gold fish which, I hope, the children will not spend all of their time fishing out!

Former Ambassador Joseph E. Davies came with my son, Elliott, to lunch. It was a joy to see him again, and to hear him talk in the calmer vein which experience generates in some of us as we grow older.

At two o'clock I went over to meet some of the representatives of The Workmen's Circle, a Jewish labor organization which is having its 50th annual convention in New York City. There must have been over a thousand present in spite of the rain. They came to Hyde Park to visit my husband's grave and to see the house and library.

These are among the people who will help us to improve our democracy. And, it is for groups such as these that my husband wanted to make his collections available. Feeling that they would understand their significance; sense the atmosphere of the old house and garden and go away refreshed.

There is always a great deal of letter writing to be done the last few days before one goes away. Invariably I find myself forgetting to give most of the instructions which are important if life is run smoothly in my cottages while I am away. My two grandchildren from Texas arrived in New York City yesterday afternoon and I am overjoyed to have them with me today. What fun big families are!

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL