My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK, Tuesday—Today I am at Hyde Park to attend Memorial Day ceremonies at my husband's grave. Afterward I will have the pleasure of entertaining Senator and Mrs. Lehman, with a few other guests, at my cottage for luncheon. The Senator is making the Memorial Day address.

We drove up in the rain on Monday afternoon, but the parkway was beautiful nevertheless and the dogwood is still lovely, though I was afraid the rain would spoil the blossoms. I awoke on my porch this morning to the fragrance of lilacs and lilies-of-the-valley. At least we have the rain to thank for the way everything is growing this spring. Radishes and scallions were brought in from the garden this morning, and a little sun here and there will make many other things leap ahead as well.

Our little lambs looked slightly cold and chilly in their pasture yesterday, but the dogs, when I walked in the woods with them this morning, seemed full of joy. Any number of scents led them far away in among the undergrowth, which already has grown so thick that I cannot see anymore where they go.

There is one drawback, however, and that is the way the mosquitoes are thriving! Here it is only the end of May, but already they buzz around my head if I stand still for a moment. I am afraid this is going to be a "wonderful" year for poison ivy, too! I always take the children every year and point out to them this beautiful looking but nasty little weed. Unfortunately, when the children are playing, they do not always pay attention to just where they fall.

My sons, Elliott and Franklin, Jr., and Sue, as well as my grandson, Curtis, and his bride, are here today.

Last evening I went to a small meeting of an organization called "The Welcome Wagon." This organization has hostesses who call on newcomers to a city or an area in the country, and try to bring them quickly into the life of the community. They sign them up as volunteers in various activities, such as hospitals and settlement house work; bring gifts from the merchants and introduce them to the various shops in town; tell them how to get in touch with Boy and Girl Scouts, the Y's and schools; and once a month they hold a meeting, sometimes educational and sometimes purely social. In this way people grow more quickly into the life of the community and have a neighborly feeling.

An old friend of mine, who is the district supervisor for this area, told me that the organization is very active in Canada and throughout the United States and now is beginning to build up centers in the Scandinavian countries. About 200 people were at the meeting last night, in spite of the fact that over the Memorial Day weekend many people are away. This seems to be a good business venture, but also to have social values that are well worthwhile.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL