My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Friday—It is a relief to read that the Chrysler strike finally has been settled.

One looks seriously, however, at the newspaper account which says that the tie-up cost over a billion dollars. This is discouraging when we realize how much could be saved if the work could go on while reasonable negotiations were carried forward, with both sides obliged, at least until the facts were ascertained, to stay on their jobs.

The cost is divided between both employers and employees. Nevertheless, the employees are the ones who suffer most. In many cases the employers can afford the temporary stoppage of company income; it won't change the way they live. But it will certainly change the way of life for the worker for a long period, because he has to replace the long weeks of idleness by weeks of even harder work.

I have been spending nearly every day recently at the United Nations, both morning and afternoon, but yesterday we found that we had to change our plan of work and spend the entire day working over the three reports on the yearbook, the communications, and the report of our subcommission on minorities and discrimination.

Friday morning the Commission on Human Rights, as a whole, is not meeting. The suspension was made in order that a working committee of four delegations—France, India, the United Kingdom and the United States—can bring in a joint working paper which we hope will expedite the whole question of implementation for the commission.

At lunchtime on Thursday I talked with Mrs. Paul Wright, who is visiting this country briefly with her husband to tell us about the 1951 Festival of Britain. It sounds fascinating and I only hope that I can get over to see it.

She also is concerned about a way to develop interest in and bring to the attention of the people all over the U. S. the real problems facing the people of Europe. Her idea of joint teams composed of nationals of different countries, speaking in towns and villages all over the country and answering questions, struck me as a most interesting suggestion if the money can be found to finance it.

I am sure many people will want to congratulate Roger Baldwin on winning the 1950 One World Award and the round-the-world flight. He has done outstanding work for 30 years on civil liberties in this country and it is with the greatest joy that I saw recognition of this kind given him.

Citations were also given by the One World Committee to Mary Margaret McBride, Edward R. Murrow, Quentin Reynolds, William Wyler, Benjamin Cohen of the United Nations and General Carlos Romulo. They are all such good choices that one wants to cheer them all.

I seem to be having an orgy of play going. Wednesday night I saw Alfred Lunt and Lynn Fontaine in "I Know My Love". From beginning to end I enjoyed myself, and I know of no couple on the stage that I find more enchanting. Old or young, they were delightful in this play which jumps from the golden wedding day until the days when they first meet and when the young lady is not nearly as enthralling as she is on her golden wedding day. Tired she certainly was after 50 years of married life but the glint of humor was still in her eyes and the ability to look at things straight hadn't left her. Her marriage had been successful, but she had made it so. There is much for the young to learn in this play. Light as it was meant to be, Marcel Achard, the French author of the original, certainly "knew women"—and men.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL