My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Tuesday—I received an invitation today to attend a concert at the New School for Social Research here in New York City on May 6. This will be the last concert given this spring by Rene LeRoi, the well-known flutist. He is an old friend of mine and I have always enjoyed his music and am sorry that I will not be able to be there on this farewell date.

There is an amusing story about Mr. LeRoi that grew from the fact that he played frequently with Queen Elizabeth of Belgium who also is a magnificent musician. On one occasion she invited him so she could present him to her husband, King Albert. In doing so she said, "I want to present to you 'The King."' There was a moment of hesitation while King Albert and the flutist, whose name, translated, means "The King," hesitatingly wondered which was being presented to which. Then the Queen laughed and explained her play on words!

I spent yesterday morning at Lake Success, meeting with the Committee on Communications and reading its various reports.

The Human Rights Commission will have to make its decision on how it is going to implement the first Covenant before anything further is decided on. The type of petitions or complaints against states that have not lived up to their undertakings in accepting the Covenant can be decided only by the commission. We finished so quickly that Professor Cassin and I were able to do a short recording on the work of the commission to be included in a French radio program.

The non-governmental agencies of many countries feel very strongly that even this first Covenant should go far beyond what seems possible of accomplishment before May 20, which is the date set for closing this session. It would seem to be a question of whether you want a limited amount well done or nothing at all finished because you attempt to do so much that it cannot possibly be done!

I think the members of the Human Rights Commission probably will decide today, when they undertake to study the scope of implementation whether they want to go one step forward toward translating the aspirations and standards set in the Declaration into the laws of the various lands or whether they prefer to postpone finishing anything until later on.

Daylight saving time is with us again. As it is not uniform all over the country, we are going to have those curious little situations in which we leave New York City and arrive, for instance, in Washington, D.C., almost at the same moment. Many of us would like to see the whole country go on daylight saving. It would make it easier for those of us who have to keep fairly close track of the day's hours. One of my friends remarked that the cows and the children never took any stock in daylight saving no matter where they were. My little dogs seemed to adjust to the change very nicely on last Sunday morning and really didn't stir until they were roused.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL