My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Thursday—There's been so much excitement in the last two days!

When I left Lake Success Tuesday afternoon after a fairly useful day in which we made some progress at the Human Rights Commission meeting, we motored up the parkway toward Hyde Park. We had almost reached Poughkeepsie on our way home when suddenly in front of us we saw the lights of a car coming toward us and swerve in our direction. The car directly in front of us, going in our direction, tried to swing over but could not get over far enough and the oncoming car hit the back of it and proceeded to hit the lefthand side of our car in front.

It all happened so quickly that I hardly realized what was going on until it was all over. Then there we were with our car unable to move under its own power. Luckily, we were in front of a garage where we could leave the car and call a taxi.

I gathered up my belongings and went on home, leaving my poor chauffeur to see the car towed in and answer all the young sheriff's questions.

About an hour later, just as I had finished supper and the telephone was beginning to ring with questions as to what had happened Mr. Linaka, the sheriff, and a reporter from the Poughkeepsie New Yorker appeared in my cottage. I answered their few questions and spent the rest of the evening assuring the surprised newspapers and friends that no one was hurt and that I felt absolutely well!

* * *

Yesterday morning at 10 o'clock I went over to the memorial library to meet a group of high-school students on their Easter vacation trip. They came from Avon, N.Y., and had been in New York City for several days and visited Lake Success where they attended a Human Rights Commission meeting.

I talked with them a few minutes and then went home to make sure that everything was ready for lunch before returning to the Rose Garden, where Memorial Services were being held at noon.

Some of the Memorial Foundation members were there and some of the members of the Human Rights Commission came, as well as friends and neighbors. The day was really very lovely, warm and sunny but rather windy. Only the crocuses and little bluebells were up in the flower beds.

One cannot help thinking back at these ceremonies each year to April 12, 1945. How much has happened in the past five years!

I often wonder if, in any way, we who are still on this earth could somehow tune ourselves better to the universe and get more real direction from those who must know so much more in the world beyond. All we can do is to continue as best we can from day to day and hope that we follow the right path.

After our guests had had a buffet luncheon in my cottage, which is slightly crowded on these occasions, I motored down to New York with my son, Elliott, and one of his business associates.

On arriving in New York I found that much excitement had been going on there during the day! My secretary's niece, Eleanor Lund, who had come with her mother for a visit, had had an attack of appendicitis and had to be operated on. So quickly are things done in this day and age, they tell me she will be up and out by next Sunday.

Now I am waiting for the third thing to happen as things generally go in threes. When excitements start it seems we have to have three!

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL