My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Monday—It was a surprise to wake up yesterday morning to find snow on the ground and on every single branch, making the world look like a bleak, winter etching.

I walked in the woods with the dogs and snow blew down on me and it did seem a strange beginning for Easter Day. But the dogs had a wonderful walk and then the four children had a very successful Easter egg hunt right after breakfast before we went to church.

The flowers in our little church looked beautiful, as they always do on Easter Day. I suppose it is because it is the first time one sees a great mass of them together and it makes one feel that summer is near at hand.

Straight from church I started for New York City, a little afraid I would be late for my television program. But we made good time and since there was no crowd coming down, I had an hour and a half after I reached New York City, which was plenty of time to do everything unhurriedly.

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Saturday afternoon we had all driven down to my son's place at Beekman. His house and garden are sheltered by hills back of them and the result is that their daffodils are already blossoming. They also have the most delicate little bluebells blowing in the wind. Crocuses are all I can boast of as yet.

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Now I must come to the serious business of discussing the subject of Sunday's television program.

There were presented, and argued for, four different approaches to peaceful world government. The one that seemed to me the most immediate was that of the group for European Union, represented by Allen W. Dulles, who is the group's vice chairman. General William Donovan is its chairman.

This group is advocating something that quite obviously should have been done long ago. For the good of Europe it maintains that the nations of Europe must join in an economic union and change many of their cultural and political patterns. The group acknowledges that the European countries are not able industrially to compete with the efficiency of mass production in the United States, but must find ways that will enable them eventually to do so. And I think the program of European Union is one that can be carried forward within the United Nations and can bring about immediately some good results.

When we come to the Atlantic Union, represented by Elmo Roper; the Citizens for United Nations Reform, militantly argued for by Eli Culbertson; and the United World Federalists, presented by Cord Meyer, we find their programs are much more ambitious.

Mr. Culbertson said his plan is as simple as A-B-C, but I did not get the feeling that it remained so simple when one actually reached the point of having Russia refuse to cooperate. He seemed to know definitely more about what is going on inside of Russia than I thought it probable anyone could ascertain.

In all these discussions there is one thing that always bothers me:

We agree that there is a danger of war. We also agree that we do not like the prospects of atomic warfare or the back-breaking cost of the arms race that is going on at present. We agree that the United Nations is not providing us with some of the things we think essential to preserve peace in the world—a joint force instead of individual force—and an assurance that atomic energy will be safely controlled for the benefit of mankind and not for its destruction.

Some people think these points can be resolved through a federal union. But when it comes down to whether you can assure it without Russia and whether the United States would join a federal union, I cannot find that anyone knows the answer.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL