My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK, Friday—Last Sunday night I took the train to Cleveland, where I spent two days with a friend of mine who has just had her second baby girl. Little Mayris Michelle Martin was only three days old, but she looked as plump and well accustomed to this world as any little mite could look.

From Cleveland I flew early Wednesday morning to Louisville. Fortunately the weather treated me kindly and I was on time. At eleven o'clock there was a convocation of students and faculty of the University of Louisville. Mr. H. F. Willkie, vice president of Joseph E. Seagram & Sons, Inc., was given a degree and I was given an award of merit, a charming little statue of Minerva done by one of their art department sculptors. The Memorial Auditorium in which I spoke is a building in which segregation is not permitted; so students from both colored and white colleges attended.

From there we went to a lunch where I was presented with the key to the city and where several others were given scrolls for their work in the International Center, under whose auspices I went to Louisville to speak in the evening.

After lunch there was a press conference and then a panel discussion on foreign affairs was recorded for use in the evening. The gentlemen with me in the discussion were Mr. Wilson Wyatt, prominent Louisville lawyer who acted as moderator, Dr. John Taylor, president of the University of Louisville and Mr. Mark Ethridge, editor of the Louisville Courier-Journal, who has done so much work for the United Nations on various conciliation groups. It was a pleasure to see them all again and to renew my acquaintance with Dr. Taylor whom I had met in Berlin while he was educational adviser to General Clay.

At four-thirty we attended a reception given by the foreign students who are brought over and given training here under the auspices of the Seagram corporation. Mr. Willkie insists that these students have broadened the interests and added to the alertness and intelligence of the members of his organization. They are all graduate students and come from many countries—South America, the Far and Near East and Europe. There are no strings tied to the training they receive. The technical part of it is carried on in the business itself and in their laboratories; other courses are attended at the university.

There are many other values in this program, not the least of which is the fact that the young students come in close contact with American people and American civic, political and charitable organizations, so that they gain a real understanding of the way we live and think and feel in this country. These students must go back and work in their own country, that is the only obligation attached to their training at Seagrams. They can continue their education elsewhere if they so desire, but in the long run they are expected to be of benefit to their homeland. Indirectly I think this is beneficial to us. For returning to the various countries will be people who have gained an insight into American life and American character.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL