My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Monday—Yesterday evening I went to see the photographic exhibit of the Police Athletic League at the 34th Street Armory, here, where the press photographers' show was going on. Of course, I only had a glimpse of that show as I walked through, but it looked very exciting and I wish I had had time to see the whole show.

As it was, there were just a few minutes in which to look at what the Boys' Clubs, organized by the Police Athletic League, had accomplished in the way of photography. They had asked me to be one of the judges, but I felt I could not give enough time to be of any value as a judge. So, I was glad to see Jinx Falkenberg and her young son come in to be among the judges just as I was leaving. I am sure that, as a combination, they helped the other judges to do a good job.

The photographs certainly deserved careful scrutiny. They were well chosen. They reflected the interest of the boys and considerable effort on their part. I liked the photograph of a family of ducks sailing along on a pond, but I was not surprised to find a number of pictures of boxing matches.

Police Commissioner William P. O'Brien was there and told me with evident pride that the police force now gives more time and effort to the preventive side of their work where youth is concerned. He said the policeman can be a boy's friend and not his enemy. He also told me that their program for youth is followed now by many other police departments.

Great Britain is doing a good job along this line, and so is Sweden. In other countries of Europe there are active projects carried on by the police force with the boys of the various communities. They are busy doing constructive things instead of idly looking for ways in which to circumvent the law.

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After I reached Westbrook, Conn., on Saturday morning I had a walk in the woods with my friend, Esther Lape. The snow was not too deep and we went first to a particular spot where a great tree grows and where she spreads food in various receptacles for the birds during the winter.

The sky was blue and the day was really wonderful. As we walked quietly along Miss Lape stopped suddenly and pointed ahead. There, bounding through the woods, was a doe with her white tail high—the most graceful sight I have seen in many a long day.

I enjoyed my visit to Providence and to New London. My hosts in Providence had a Scottie that is considerably older than Fala, which gave me a pleasant feeling that Fala might be enjoying life for some years to come. Their little fellow was as clever at tricks as Fala, and he did a number that I had never thought to try to teach Fala.

It was a busy program in Providence. Everyone seemed so genuinely interested in the United Nations and its work that I felt no fatigue.

In New London on Saturday night I decided that our younger generation here in New England, as far as students are concerned, is deeply interested in human rights. They showed it as clearly as it was manifested in other parts of the country during my recent trip. I hope they keep their enthusiasm as they grow older, for it will make of our nation a better example to the world of what democracy actually means.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, NHyP