My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Friday—I am sure all of us are conscious of the tremendous strain that the Mayor of the City of New York undergoes. His is no easy job.

It is probably fortunate for Mayor William O'Dwyer that his doctors have made him go to the hospital in plenty of time to avoid a real breakdown. Physical exhaustion and heart strain are bad, but rest can cure them. We join with thousands of other people in this great city in being grateful for the work which the Mayor does day in and day out. We wish him a good rest and a quick return to his usual energy and strength.

Tonight there will be a Democratic fund-raising dinner but the Mayor will be absent. He will be missed in spite of the fact that everyone will recognize the obvious truth that it probably will be necessary for the Mayor to attend fewer banquets and receptions so that he will not become exhausted again.

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Yesterday we moved from Washington Square to the Park-Sheraton Hotel. I would miss the Square more if I did not have such a lovely view of Central Park from my new apartment. I also can see the George Washington Bridge in the distance. It is beautiful during the day and like a fairyland when the lights come on.

Having placed furniture and hung pictures and unpacked most of the afternoon yesterday, at 5:30 I went to Ambassador and Mrs. Austin's for tea to meet the members of the Vermont State Board of Education. This group has come to spend three days with the United States delegation to the United Nations. The members are having seminars and going out to meetings and studying how they can integrate into their school system more real teaching on the subject of the U.N.

This is a very encouraging thing for the state of Vermont to do. It would be wonderful if every state in the Union would follow the example.

I saw Ambassador Austin's portrait which soon will hang in the State House in Vermont. It is a fine likeness in which the artist has caught a delightful expression.

* * *

After the delegation meeting yesterday morning I waited around the rest of the day thinking that the items from Committee Three would come up in the plenary session of the General Assembly. The whole afternoon went by, however, without my having to go out to Flushing. I hope we will get to these items today and pass them without too many speeches.

In any case, I shall meet with some twenty boys from the Millbrook School who are coming down to spend most of Friday at Flushing. We plan to gather in one of the conference rooms where I'll attempt to answer their questions, which I am sure will be numerous. Such trips are particularly valuable to 16 and 17-year-old boys who are studying international questions and are already familiar with the background of some of the subjects which may be up for discussion in the U.N.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL