My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Monday—It is reassuring to read in the newspapers that both Secretary of Defense Louis Johnson and General Omar Bradley, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, state that we are not going to rearm Germany.

I hope that Germany can become a prosperous nation. But I also hope that enough democratization can go on so that the old nationalist spirit, which insisted that the German race should rule the world and thereby brought on two World Wars, can be a memory of the past.

Loving one's country does not of necessity mean that one must feel that one's country has to rule the rest of the world. It does not mean that one's people are better than any other people even though one may feel different! We must be very sure that Germany has learned that lesson once and for all.

In fact, I look forward to the day when we will have reached the point of talking only of strength within the United Nations to enforce decisions of the United Nations and to keep down any aggressor nation anywhere in the world. Instead of talking of rearming a nation, we will talk of giving a nation sufficient military strength for police purposes within its own areas and not for any aggressive use beyond its boundaries. We will rely on the force within the United Nations for any international action.

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Yesterday our first taste of winter brought discomfort to a great many people motoring up or down between New York City and Albany. Mr. and Mrs. Danny Kaye came to lunch with me at Hyde Park and spent hours getting to the cottage. Then it took additional hours for them to get home. I felt very guilty, for I would have loved to have them stay the night, but I knew they had an engagement in New York City and hoped to get back in time. Instead, they spent most of the evening fighting the weather on the road down.

My son, James, who flew in from the West Coast, spent five hours motoring up from the city. This morning we came down by train, as I had no delegation meeting and no morning meeting at Lake Success.

The first snow at Hyde Park is always beautiful and Fala's grandson, Tamas, always has a good time rolling and playing in it. Even Fala, dignified as he is, made straight for the edge of the pond and slid around on the ice, which is covered by a thin coating of snow. The evergreen branches were weighted down and at night the scene looked fairylike. But I am glad to find there is very little snow left in the city.

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This afternoon when we meet again at Lake Success, Committee Three takes up the convention on the traffic in persons. This has been returned to us from Committee Six. Our work is so nearly at an end now that I hope it will not take long to finish it. Of course, the items must come up in the plenary session and I must attend those sessions after our regular meetings are over.

* * *

I read with interest this morning that the Shah of Iran, who told us on Thanksgiving Day in Hyde Park how much he enjoyed flying, had piloted one of our B-25 bombers when he visited Dayton. He owns a B-17, and I had heard that he was a daring pilot, skillful but reckless.

When I told him this he smiled and answered, "There are bold pilots but no old bold pilots." At least, he knows that there is wisdom in being wary and in not taking unnecessary risks.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL