My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

Text Size: Small Text Normal Text Large Text Larger Text

NEW YORK, Thursday—Monday, November 7, was a day I will remember for a long time, as the second volume of my autobiography, "This I Remember," came out that day. Mary Margaret McBride asked me to be on her broadcast and devoted the better part of an hour to discussing it.

I am very grateful for the very interesting reviews which I have read in the Sunday papers. The one by Vincent Sheean in the New York Herald Tribune and Elizabeth Janeway's in the New York Times made me feel somewhat humble. I never expected to do work which such excellent critics would consider good. Arthur Schlesinger, Jr., in the Saturday Review of Literature and Lewis Gannett and others in their columns in Monday's papers were also most kind. It would seem that I have accomplished that which I hoped could be done, but which I realized fully was a difficult task. I seem to have added something to the record which may be of value to the historians of the future.

I was very happy when I heard that the Book of the Month Club had accepted "This I Remember," since I thought that meant it would have an appeal to a wide group of readers. Mary Margaret McBride seemed to think that many people would be glad of the decision made by Harper's to reprint "This Is My Story," so the two volumes can be bought together.

Of course, Miss McBride is a good and generous friend to be so interested in my book. I was happy to have John Golden come to listen to our broadcast and approve of all that we said which included incidentally a mention of the Mid-Century White House Conference on Children, which takes place in January 1950, and some questions by Mary Margaret on the present United Nations activities in the present General Assembly.

I have just been told that though the manuscript of my book as it appeared in McCall's did not make a mistake, there is one in the book which I hope can be corrected in future editions. In some way a slip was made in referring to Mrs. Mary McLeod Bethune as "the late" Mrs. Bethune. Since she is now trying to raise large sums for her college and is most active, I am sure I could not have overlooked such a mistake. But one never can tell what one's eyes will do when one had read a manuscript many, many times. I only wish here to apologize to her and assure her that it will be changed in the future editions.

* * *

In a few days a United Nations publication, called "Peace On Earth," will be out. I saw an advance copy the other day and it is so attractive that I hope many people will buy it.

* * *

Tuesday I was unexpectedly invited by the Department of State to take the 7:30 a.m. plane and spend the morning in Washington discussing Human Rights and the present and future work of the Commission on Human Rights with a large group of non-governmental organizations at the State Department. I had an afternoon meeting of Committee 3, but they put me on the plane for the return trip at 1:11 p.m. and I was able to be in two places in one day!

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL