My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK, Sunday—I arrived back in Hyde Park a little after 5 p.m. Saturday to find my four young English guests already here. They come from Nottingham on scholarships raised in memory of my husband. The Lord Mayor of Nottingham wrote me that the money had been given because of the gratitude felt by their people for everything done in Great Britain during the war by my husband. They wished to send young businessmen of their area to this country for a three or four-months period to study American business and American life.

The four young men have now completed their tour and this is their last weekend in this country. I will be much interested in hearing the impressions which they have gathered in their time over here.

Meantime, I must go back and tell you something of my own trip these past few days. After speaking at Columbia University Tuesday evening, I boarded the midnight plane for Atlanta, Georgia. But instead of arriving very early in the morning, as I anticipated, I spent a long time in Charlotte, North Carolina. There we waited for hours until the weather cleared sufficiently to allow us to land in Atlanta. The delay made little difference in my plans for the day, except that I did not get the hour or two of sleep I had hoped for in a comfortable bed before I started out for Warm Springs! I did have time to wash up and breakfast, and then Mr. and Mrs. Henry J. Toombs motored me to Warm Springs.

It is over four years since I have been there, and I think all the buildings spreading out in a square from Georgia Hall are now complete. Everything in the way of trees and shrubs has grown luxuriously, and it is very beautiful. After luncheon in the main dining room, I went up to see my husband's little house. They had their one hundred thousandth visitor the other day. The basement has been turned into a little museum, but the other rooms look just the same and the approach is gradually being made very lovely, with terraces and flowers everywhere. I thought everything had been done with loving thought and great care. I wish that the flowers around the house could be brought back in the way that Mrs. Michael Hoke had them during her stay there. They always gave my husband great pleasure, and I think it would add a great deal to the present surroundings of the house.

After driving around the other buildings and looking at the exercise pool, I went back to talk with the patients in Georgia Hall. Then I drove back to Atlanta, where our old friend, Lizzie McDuffie, came to see me at Mrs. Toombs' house. A number of pleasant people came to dine that night, and I enjoyed seeing them and being again with my hosts. Elliott, who had driven his children to Texas, arrived late Wednesday afternoon.

All day Thursday I spent in meetings with the groups sponsoring a workshop to study the Universal Bill of Human Rights. In the evening I spoke before an audience of 2000 people on the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the draft of the Convention. At 5:30 a.m. Friday, Elliott and I started on the drive home. It was quite a long pull, but we accomplished it very successfully and I am glad to be back, though the mountain of mail awaiting me is quite terrifying.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL