My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK, Sunday—A few days ago a group of very distinguished citizens formed themselves into a Citizens' Committee to draft ex-Governor Lehman for the United States Senate nomination. At the same time they unveiled the first poster in their campaign.

I am very glad to hear that a group of influential citizens have made up their minds that it is important for this country to have the former governor run for the Senate this fall. I hope they will not only put their energies into obtaining him as a candidate, but also see that all possible groups and the people as a whole, in this state, are informed of the importance of his election.

Questions coming before the Senate at the present time require the kind of experience which former Governor Lehman's past work has given him. In dealing with foreign affairs today, one of the necessary fields with which to be familiar is the areas where the war has made relief necessary. Herbert Lehman administered that relief in the years when it was most crucial. He visited the countries himself, and knows many of the men within those lands. That is a good background for understanding the problems which come up today in helping to rehabilitate those areas economically, culturally and spiritually.

The former Governor is a man of great integrity and recognizes the moral and spiritual values that are of prime importance in the world today. Familiar with economic questions, he has carried great responsibilities in the economic field.

Ex-Governor Lehman has had administrative and executive experience in one of the great states of the union, where almost every problem touching on our national life can be studied in the light of the state. For example, problems such as the conservation of natural resources and the development of water power are already matters which he has studied intimately as they touch New York State and, of necessity, as they have affected other states in the union and the nation as a whole.

In addition, ex-Governor Lehman has one of the most important qualifications without which no public man today can really approach public service successfully. He has the heart and the experience to understand problems affecting human beings. He knew Lillian Wald and her work intimately. He has given much of his own resources to meet some of the vital needs, such as housing, in his own city. In so doing, his heart has been educated as well as his head. We can be sure that every problem coming before the Senate would be viewed from this broad background of experience. There are not many men in public life who can contribute as much.

I, for one, hope therefore that he will accept the nomination and receive the loyal backing of his own party and of the other public-spirited citizens of our state.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL