My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK, Friday—Yesterday I left Hyde Park in the morning and then took an afternoon train to Saybrook, Connecticut, in order to speak in the evening to the League of Women Voters at Clinton.

It seemed to me as I travelled along the seashore that the first signs of autumn were visible and I cannot say that I like the idea of summer drawing to a close.

On Wednesday at Hyde Park we had a violent thunder storm and in the middle of the storm hail stones fell. It was so late in the evening I could not go out to see whether any damage had been done to the fruit trees by this freak storm. As my crab apple trees are filled with fruit ready to be made into jelly, I shall be distressed if I find they have been injured.

The storm certainly surprised my two small dogs. I let them in the house from their yard because they have a great dislike of being away from human society when there is thunder! They cannot get close enough to one, nor hide far enough away from the flashing of the lightning. Both the dogs and I were conscious of being stung by the hail stones as they fell.

My son, Elliott, took his older children into the city Wednesday and he and Elliott, Junior, went to see "Mr. Roberts," which I know they both enjoyed. My granddaughter went to see "Kiss Me Kate" and I am sure she also enjoyed this charming musical comedy. They are unspoiled children, so they are sure to have a good time.

I am journeying back to Hyde Park this afternoon feeling, as usual, happy and gay to be getting home again, for we are to have a picnic supper tonight with one of our neighbors. We are also going to supper on Saturday night with another neighbor.

* * *

The members of the House of Representatives seem to be slipping away so fast that they have decided to adjourn until September 21st and leave the Senate at work. It is a little hard on the senators, I think, because I imagine the average age in the Senate is higher than that of the members of the House and they must feel the pull of the long, hot summer even more keenly than the Representatives.

The other day I read a criticism of some of the members of the House for missing certain roll calls, but judging from the attitude of members of Congress, when I have been in the gallery, I think there must be a good many of them who are hardly aware when a roll call is being taken. It makes a curious impression upon one to sit in the gallery and watch the rather uninterested way in which members come and go during a speech. One wonders whether there is really much value in these speeches when so few members seem to listen to them.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL