My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK, Thursday—It seems sad that we still are unable to pass a satisfactory bill which would allow us to receive into this country immediately, as many as possible of the displaced persons still in camps in Europe. By waiting, we are simply giving the opportunity to other nations to select the kind of people they desire. The remainder will be people more difficult to place in our economy because they will either be highly trained in one particular area so they cannot work in any other, or they will have no particular training and have for that reason been rejected by other countries.

There are still in the DP camps a number of well-trained people like doctors, whom we need in different areas of our country. I am glad that a new organization has been formed to help this type of refugee find the proper place in our midst. Carefully placed and given an initial start, they certainly will be of great value to us.

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For several days it has been somewhat busy here. On Tuesday the Hudson Shore Labor School held a picnic on my grounds. They have some pupils this year from England, one from Hungary, who has been to several countries, and one or two others from different parts of the world, as well as a sprinkling of both union and non-union students from all over the United States. They seemed an interesting group and we discussed United Nations activities as well as some of the other questions that are purely of domestic interest.

I have had staying with me the past two days an English woman, Lady Greenwood, the widow of the chairman of the executive committee of the Pilgrims Society who presided at the time that the statue of my husband was placed in Grosvenor Square, London. She was visiting in Canada and came here to see the replica of the statue given by the Pilgrims to the memorial library. She has been most interested in seeing everything at the memorial and said that she will try to obtain certain information which the library historian is anxious to have in connection with the ceremony that took place in London.

I enjoyed having her very much and was glad also yesterday to be visited by one of the leaders of the Brazilian Red Cross, Madame da Fonseca. She came with her son as an interpreter and brought another lady to lunch with us. Mme. Da Fonseca did remarkable work during the war in organizing the Brazilian Red Cross and is continuing her work even now, though her son told me he thought she should take a rest and help to take care of his two children!

Doris Fleeson, Washington columnist, spent the day on her way from Nantucket back to Washington. I am always happy to see her because one expects journalists and war correspondents to lose some of their enthusiasm and convictions. Doris always feels strongly and bolsters my feeling that it is worth fighting for the things one believes in. This is something all of us at times get a little weary of doing!

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL