My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK, Monday—The blessed rain came to us on Sunday and Mrs. James P. Hendrick, who was staying with us, and I drew attention to the fact that we prophesied it on Saturday afternoon.

It was gentle and lasted most of the day, and I am sure it did a world of good for the farmers in our area. I could be thankful only for the sake of the crops but a little bit sad that it had not come during Saturday or Sunday night.

The Hyde Park Historical Association entertained 49 members of the United Nations Secretariat during the day, and the rain, I am afraid, did not add to the enjoyment of our visitors and it certainly worried us. It had been planned to use my picnic grounds for a luncheon which the members of the 4-H Club were going to serve. Instead, the group had to go indoors, but in any case I was told that the 4-H members did themselves proud and that everyone enjoyed the luncheon. The foreign guests were told about the organization and the type of training that the members of the 4-H clubs get and it seemed to interest them.

I lunched at home because Dr. Leone Baumgartner drove up with her husband to see me. Since she is in New York City only two days a week and in Washington the other five, I felt I wanted to have an opportunity to talk to her quietly. She is taking Dr. Martha Eliot's place in the Children's Bureau, and I am, of course, deeply interested in anything that concerns that department.

At three o'clock I went over to the FDR library to meet the group from the U.N. and I had an opportunity to shake hands with many of them and to answer some of their questions on a wire recorder which they had brought up.

* * *

Saturday morning my son, Elliott, went down early to New York City to meet his three children who arrived from Fort Worth, Texas. It is a joy to have them back again and by afternoon when I was showing Mr. and Mrs. Hendrick and their two sons the livestock on the place, I was amused to see Elliott, Jr., drive up with the farm truck and begin to unload some feed for the pigs. Right on the first day he was back on his job of work on the farm. His brother, Chandler*, also went to work at once on his little Arab mare, which has to be broken this year to the saddle.

Now we have eight children here, ranging from two to 15 years of age, and after Sunday night's supper as I heard them at play I felt we must have nearer 80. So much noise seems to be necessary to bring about real enjoyment and express the feeling of putting their all into their play.

E. R.
*ER most probably meant her granddaughter Chandler's brother, David.
TMs, AERP, FDRL