My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK, Sunday—Thursday night I went to Carnegie Hall to the dedication of the WFDR FM radio station, built by the International Ladies Garment Workers Union. It was a fine program with a great many outstanding artists, but I think the deepest impression on me was made by Mr. Murrow's speech, in which he pointed out what it would mean to the stations to have the constant reminder of these four letters before them.

It is a wonderful thing that Mr. Dubinsky and the ILGWU are doing. The voice of labor will be reaching more and more people. Labor, which at one time could reach so few people to tell them the story of situations as this story appeared to them, can never again be prevented from having its say.

Because labor has come to maturity, however, a great responsibility now rests on its shoulders. It is not only the big business men these days who carry political and economic responsibility. With each new acquisition of power, labor acquires greater responsibility.

I think the people in that great hall realized this, and I am very glad that this station is to carry my husband's initials. I think he would have been glad that they chose to use them, and I think it will be an inspiration to follow in the spirit of his leadership. He wanted labor to gain in power because he felt that power had been unequally distributed in the past. But he wanted justice and fair play for everyone and he trusted the people of the nation to work for the greatest good of the greatest number.

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Friday was practically the last day on which the Human Rights Commission did any new work. We finished the items on our agenda as far as we were able. A number of points we could do nothing about and had to postpone until next session. I think, however, that on our main piece of work—the Convention on Human Rights—we have done a good job, as far as it can be done before it goes the rounds of government for comment.

The USSR was very bitter because we did not have time to give adequate consideration to the economic and social articles, or to vote on them. But neither did we have time to make the decision as to whether any of these articles were to be included in the present covenant or whether they should form the subject matter of a second covenant, or whether there were to be one or more protocols attached to this covenant and open for nations to sign as they found themselves prepared to do so.

The USSR made a great effort to get a vote on two points at least—their article on the right to work and their article that women should receive equal pay with men for equal work. Delegate after delegate explained that they had a great interest in these articles, but had not yet made up their minds as to how they should be presented to the various nations and did not feel that there was sufficient time for consideration to enable anyone to make any decision on the articles themselves.

There will be a session on Monday and that should wind up our work for this year.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL