My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

Text Size: Small Text Normal Text Large Text Larger Text

NEW YORK, Tuesday—Early last Saturday morning Elliott, Faye and I made our way to the airport to meet Franklin, Jr., on his return from his short trip abroad, which included a visit to Israel. I don't know why he always seems to arrive at six a.m., but at this season I don't mind it. In fact, every time I get up very early in the summer I wonder why I don't reverse my habits and arise with the dawn and go to bed as the dark descends on us.

We all went back to my apartment for breakfast where Jonathan Daniels joined us. He has just come up from Raleigh, North Carolina, to serve on the Subcommission on Minorities and Discrimination at the United Nations. He has his daughters with him, so I hope we will have the pleasure of seeing them all at Hyde Park for a day while they are here.

I wish it had been possible for Mr. Daniels to accept the Secretaryship of the Navy. It would have been nice to carry on an old tradition and have another Daniels heading the Navy, but I realize that he has so many interests connected with the newspaper world that it would be difficult to tear himself away.

* * *

We reached Hyde Park in time for Miss Thompson and Mrs. Lash to go with Faye and me to lunch with the advisory committee of the women's division of the Democratic State Committee, which was having an all-day meeting in Poughkeepsie. This advisory committee is a good idea. Each woman covers a whole judicial district and she can be extremely helpful both to the women who are active in her district and in keeping in touch with the headquarters of the state committee. They are planning many activities between now and next fall, including educational work and the improvement of the organization of women.

I was glad to see that a good many of these women are fairly young! Mrs. William H. Good, our Democratic National Committeewoman, was there and I am sure everyone felt as I did that it was a great tribute for her to take the trouble to drive over from her home in Connecticut.

After lunch the women went to the Hyde Park memorial library and the old house, and laid a wreath on my husband's grave. About five o'clock they came to tea with me at my cottage.

* * *

Sunday saw quite a group of youngsters and their parents gathered at my cottage for a picnic lunch and a swim, for it was a really hot and sunny day. Fortunately, we did not have a thunderstorm such as the one that visited us Saturday evening when we tried to have a birthday party out-of-doors. Right in the middle of it came the storm and children, food and birthday cake all had to be moved indoors to escape a thorough soaking.

As usual, poison ivy seems to be one of our main crops, and, instead of the children getting it, Elliott and Faye have been suffering from bad cases! I think it is one of the most uncomfortable ailments in the world and I have yet to discover a good remedy.

Back to work yesterday morning. I hope that by tomorrow evening we may have finished the Covenant as it has been worked over in the past so that we can have Wednesday and Thursday to consider new articles presented for part two of that agreement.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL