My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Wednesday—One is beginning to feel that there is no honesty anywhere. At least, that is the impression one gets in reading about Congressional investigations!

In the newspapers one finds reports of one accusation after another that this man in public office or that man in public office is feathering his own nest. One would think that one public official hounded to death would make us all cautious about accusations for a little while. But, no; the papers are covered now with stories insinuating a dereliction of duty by David Lilienthal, Secretary of Defense Louis Johnson, and Secretary of the Air Force W. Stuart Symington. Not so long ago I heard it rumored that even the President didn't escape these insinuations.

One begins to wonder whether people who are so constantly investigating couldn't find any better way of using their time. The House Armed Services Committee has asked for $50,000, plus subpoena powers, to carry on its latest investigation. I hope the results justify the expenditures in both money and time.

I want to see some time devoted to the President's program, which I read the other day Congress felt could not be considered at this session. I want to know if people in the government are not honest. I know that all men may make mistakes, but if public servants are really dishonest it should be proved and they should be dismissed in the quickest time possible. However, we shouldn't be kept all the time reading of the misdeeds of our public servants before there is any proof actually available.

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I had a letter not long ago from a woman in Orlando, Fla., a self-styled Greek-American. She is deeply troubled about the plight of the children of Greece. She says: "Have mercy on the children of Greece. Make a story of the human side of their suffering!"

One does not need to make a story of the suffering of children. Americans know only too well that in a country which has been war-torn as long as Greece has, children have lost their parents or become separated from them. The people of Greece are poverty-stricken. They are doing what they can for these children—putting them into institutions and caring for them as best they can on the very limited funds available.

I know Americans have already given to relief in every part of the world and most Americans are conscious of the fact that the United States is doing a great deal for Greek rehabilitation. But just because we are still in Greece, with soldiers and technicians trying to work out a solution to their military and economic situation, it is perhaps natural that they will turn to us again and ask us to help. Thousands of their children are eating scant rations, are poorly clad, not too well housed, and sadly neglected as to schooling.

Those in this country who have a real feeling for Greece and for her wonderful traditions will want to do just a little more, I am sure, to help this woman who signs herself, "A simple, loyal Greek-American housewife," and who is anxious to get a drive started for the aid of the helpless children of Greece. There is, of course, a Greek Relief Organization and perhaps people who care to make contributions will emphasize the fact that the future of any country depends on the well-being of its children.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL