My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK, Sunday—In the meeting of Committee Three at Lake Success on Friday, most of the day was devoted to a long discussion of whether or not the United Kingdom convention should be finished at this session. These procedural discussions always take a long time and sometimes seem wasteful. Yet I believe they serve a useful purpose by bringing out the thinking of the various members.

In this case it was quite apparent that there was a general feeling of working under pressure. The target date for the close of this session of the General Assembly has been set for May 14, and there is a desire to handle some of the other items on the agenda. The final decision was to finish the United States and French conventions on freedom of information, which have been amalgamated, and present them to the General Assembly for approval. But it was decided not to ask the countries to ratify until the second United Kingdom convention is completed at the autumn session, when the two, which complement each other, can be ratified at one and the same time.

The other items on our agenda should not take so much time. But since the Human Rights Commission holds its first session tomorrow at 10 a.m., it is going to be slightly complicated for me as well as for a number of other people—like Dr. Malik of Lebanon, Dr. Chang of China and some of our other colleagues—who serve on both Committee Three and the Human Rights Commission. We hope to meet our difficulties by holding only an hour's session to organize the Human Rights Commission Monday morning and perhaps to appoint some committees from among our members. These committees can take up some of the numerous points on our lengthy agenda and prepare them for the full commission, while those of us who are obliged to be at certain sessions of Committee Three will continue to fill our obligations there.

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On Friday night in New York City I went to a preview of "Home of the Brave," a film which has already been shown in other parts of the country and which begins its New York run next Thursday. It is based on an original play by Arthur Laurents, and most of the action takes place in the Pacific theatre during the war. It is not exactly a war play, however, since it deals with the recovery of a man who, like so many others, suffered psychologically more than physically.

Although there is no hero in this play, I think you will find the dramatic story tense and absorbing throughout. In solving the problems posed, it shows us modern techniques and what can be done by intelligent medical care and science. I cannot say I enjoyed the film, in the ordinary sense, but I found it deeply moving and exciting enough to transport me completely to the areas in the Pacific which I remember so well. You cannot afford to miss seeing this movie, for the theme touches our daily lives and the future of our nation.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL